Two Painting Questions

1) I occasionally paint boards lying on saw horses. I paint one side, let it dry, then paint the other. Paint always runs over the edge of the boards and some runs down the edge. These runs form a thick mound/bead of paint. I can't figure out any way to prevent this. Any suggestions?
2) I don't understand pigmented/solid exterior stain. It seems just like paint to me. I was putting this stuff on new cedar pickets. I got the runs described above, so I scraped off these mounds of paint. Once I'd get it started the stuff peeled of the wood leaving clean completely new/unstained wood. There was no penetration of anything into the wood (and not very good adhesion). How is this stuff different from paint?
Ken
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Thanks for the suggestions.
Ken
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Ken Hall wrote:

Gee, Ken...wipe it off with a cloth, paper towel, your finger, etc. before it dries.
You can minimize your wiping by not dragging your brush over the edge toward the center - all that does is scrape off paint which then runs down the side. Instead, move your brush - ready? - slightly TOWARD the edges.
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dadiOH's dandies v3.06... ....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that. Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
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wrote:

I do that. It doesn't seem to help a lot.
Ken
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Then you must be applying waaay too much.
Bill

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Brilliant!!!! Why don't they print those instructions on the brush? You may make a fortune selling your idea to brush companies and even put it on paint cans.
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Or, if using roller, run it _gently_ along edges.
One old trick is to barely drive long common nails into ends of material and either set nails on ground on one end and up against wall or whatever on the other, or let all nails sit on horses. Doing so lets you go over all runs and drips with roller, and spread them out.
Whatever you're doing regularly, you should eventually learn to do well.
J
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But Al Gore invented the paintbrush!
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On Thu, 13 Oct 2005 10:27:22 -0500, Ken Hall

Think of it as paint by another name. Basically, that IS what it is.
Just the other day i read a blurb that it gave a solid color coverage while allowing the wood grain to show through -- yeah, just like regular paint!
BTW, sorry you got the runs while painting. Whoever does the laundry may want to use a little bleach.
FACE
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Ken Hall wrote:

You are probably loading the brush too much. OK to glob the paint onto the ends and sides, but brush it out before it sets. When I sprayed some louvered doors a while back, I kept on hand a small foam brush wrung out in mineral spirits so I could level out any runs or drips. Very handy. Might be worthwhile 'til you get the knack. End grain usually absorbs more, so I do them first, and feather back into the board so there isn't a pile of paint at the end, then paint the larger surfaces with just a little less paint appl. toward the ends. Use side of brush along the narrow sides as you go.

I have seen latex "fall" off previously oil-stained wood. Hard to tell without knowing brand/product name. Cedar is oily - did you use water base?
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