Two Outlets in One Box

I'm upgrading a GFCI-protected single duplex receptacle to a two-gang box with two duplex receptacles. Since I'm not familiar with the ins and outs of the code, do I need to pigtail the hot lead to each outlet, or can I simply connect the hot to the first receptacle and feed the second with a short lead from the other hot terminal on the first receptacle?
Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
in this case you need to run the second outlet off the gfi or it wont be gfi protected. i could be wrong, but i believe if you put multiple outlets in a box with a gfi, they must all be gfi.
the FIRST thing you need to do is read the instructions on the gfi. if its operation isnt clear to you, hire a pro otherwise there is a good chance you will not have ANY protected outlets.
randy

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I understand how the GFCI works and how it should be wired, but in this case, it's unimportant. The existing receptacle to be expanded to two is downstream from the GFCI and protected by it.
My question is, when I install the two-gang box and the second receptacle, do I need to pigtail the hot feeds to both outlets or can I wire them in series (i.e. the hot/neutral from one receptacle feeds the second receptacle)?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/3/2005 10:59 AM US(ET), bakerguy took fingers to keys, and typed the following:

Don't know if it is code, but I would just connect the hot to hot, and neutral to neutral (plus ground), from one outlet to the other. I don't see how using a pigtail would be any different, other than using more space in the box (for wire nuts). You're just making the same connections at a different location.
--
Bill

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You can do it either way. However, I prefer the pigtails. If the wires were to become loose on one receptacle, it would have no effect on the other.
John Grabowski http://www.mrelectrician.tv

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

ya ok. when i first read it i thought you were going to pigtail the gfi and the other outlet seperately.
i personally think the pigtail method was easier to install, and as was mentioned by someone else, less likely to create multiple failures. in my area either method will pass inspection. your mileage may vary.
randy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I always pig-tail. That way if the 39 cent outlet craps I only loose one device.
39 cent used as example only.
I do not know if it is code to pig-tail. I do not do much residential work so it may be something that I have gotten used to reading specs and such over the years.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<< I'm upgrading a GFCI-protected single duplex receptacle to a two-gang box with two duplex receptacles. >>
Be sure to get the biggest box (deepest) that you can. The bruised knuckles you save will make it worthwhile. HTH
Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks for the input, all. I just finished the job and ended up wiring one outlet to the other because of the space concerns. I also talked to a buddy of mine that does this kind of work here and either will pass inspection.
The one question I forgot to ask: since it's a 20-amp kitchen circuit, did I need to use the 20-amp receptacles (i.e. is it code)? When I got home from the box store, I realized that the rest of the outlets on the two 20-amp kitchen circuits are all 15-amps, including the GFCI's, although looking closely, they say they're 20-amp pass-through. What does NEC say?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.