"Twisty" fluorescent bulbs

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---MIKE--- wrote:

I had an issue with bulbs having very short life in a ceiling fan that was run more or less constantly; I replaced the bulb with a fluorescent and it too burned out quickly. However the second fluorescent as far as I know is still in there and working fine. I'm guessing the vibration of the fan was causing the incandescents to fail, not sure why the first fluorescent failed.
I also used one of the fluorescents in a blast cabinet that just ate light bulbs, that seems to be working out well.
nate
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I've had several of these bulbs, and have generally been disappointed with the life span. I've had them in lamps and overhead lighting, one of which is a basement stairs light that I leave on constantly. That bulb lasted only about 1 1/2 years. The shop light tubes that I have last longer than that and they are cycled on and off regularly. Once the price drops on the flourecent bulbs to that of incandecents, or once the technology improves the life span, they will probably be a good choice; but for now, I'm sticking with incandecents.
Smooth ---MIKE--- wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

I currently have 4 in service, two outside ones that were installed years ago. I think I replaced one of them. They are on 24/7. Two are in table lambs that cycle as any table lamp would - on and off. Been there a long time and haven't replaced either.
Harry K
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Harry K wrote:

Ewe sure about that? ;)
R
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---MIKE--- wrote:

I've got about 20 or so in use and haven't replaced any of them in ages. They get varying amounts of on time, from 24 hr on a couple to an hour here and there on others.
Pete C.
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---MIKE--- wrote:

I typically get at least one year continious on. Thats well above normal lifespan. I get 61000 hours. An incandesent is only supposed to last 1500 hrs, thats with a long lasting bulb. Cycling and other things will certaily matter.
gs
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zek wrote:

I multiplied wrong. I multiplied time 7. It should be 8760 hrs for the CF.
gs
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That's a year on your planet? :-)
Nick
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On Mon, 20 Nov 2006 08:38:11 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (---MIKE---) wrote:

Yes, things are tested under ideal conditions. They often perform much worse in real conditions. You get the same thing with wireless devices, that give much less range than advertised.
--
35 days until the winter solstice celebration

Mark Lloyd
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---MIKE--- wrote:

I guess my experience is different from many of the other posters here. I have had exceptionally good longevity with most of my CF bulbs. We have dozens of them, almost every light fixture in our house has a CF. And we have many of them for over a decade.
I have had two early mortality incidents where two brand new CF bulbs from the same batch died within a couple weeks of installation. Aside from that, most failures have been due to breakage. The latest one broke when my 9-year-old son was throwing a ball in the hallway. (we made him buy a new on with his own money.) The one before that broke when we were moving some lumber around in the basement and broke one. A few others have broken when I was unscrewing them to put them in another fixture. (We do a bit of shifting around to decide what wattages are better in different fixtures.) And as others have said, Lights of America brand is junk. We had a few of those and each one of those died. Aside from those breakage incidents, and the LOA, I think only a couple have ever burnt out. I still have the first CF we bought back when they first came out ~15 years ago. It's not a very good one, greenish color and not very bright so it has been relegated to the back of the basement storage area, but it still works as good as the day we bought it.
We didn't just go out and buy a whole house worth of bulbs all at once, we tended to buy a few at a time and gradually replaced incandescents, over a period of about 15 years. So this means that we have a lot of different generations of CF design. The average age of a CF in our house is probably about 7 years old, and all of them aside from LOA seem to be doing just fine.
It appears to significantly reduce our electric usage. We have a 2200 sq. ft. house with 2 adults and 2 kids, and summertime electric usage is about 200KwH/month. But is goes up in the winter partly due to more usage of lights, but more significantly due to use of the blower motor in our gas-fired forced-air furnace. And our stove and clothes dryer are gas, so that's a couple big electric uses we don't have. Other than that, we have typical electric loads, so it seems to me that our electric usage is rather low considering that we don't otherwise go to any special trouble to lower our usage. So I'm a big proponent of switching all your lights over to CF.
Ken
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There are some reasons this happens - mostly from using them where they do not do well.
1. Avoid the dollar store ones - I have found them to be stool specimens.
2. Their life will be shortened by being turned on and off a lot. Do not use them in motion sensor lights. (One exception is the N:Vision 3-watt, if I am not mistaken about that one being a cold cathode version.)
3. Compact fluorescents easily overheat in small enclosed fixtures, recessed ceiling fixtures, and other downlights such as ceiling fan fixtures. This occurs more with higher wattages, especially over 23 watts (slightly dimmer than a 100W incandescent). Philips SLS ones (not spiral) of 15, 20 and 23 watts (and not the dimmable one) are specifically rated to take the heat buildup of recessed ceiling fixtures.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Try a different brand. I had trouble with Sylvanias. But other brands last forever so far.
These bulbs are supposed to last much longer than incandescent types. I have had several of them give up the ghost way too soon (the last was a Philips brand). Has anyone else had this problem?
---MIKE---

>> (44 15' N - Elevation 1580')
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On Mon, 20 Nov 2006 08:38:11 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (---MIKE---) wrote:

A long time ago I did, but I contacted the Manufacturer, they wanted them back, and for my time, I got replacements and a box (postage paid) to return the old ones.
This was years ago, and I think it was GE.
later,
tom @ www.MeetANewFriend.com
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