"Twisty" fluorescent bulbs

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mm wrote:

And pull down all the window shades too. <G>
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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wrote:

Light doesn't exist. what you think is light is an illusion caused by not having enough darkness.
You still need to close the door. Leaving it open could allow too much darkness to enter.
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After some thought I've decide not to try above strategy..... changing lights form CF to incandescent as season changes.
After some thought.... Iv decide there will be instances where I need some heat early in the morning.... but may not need heat at all by the afternoon such as in early spring or fall.
So a separate electric heater would be a better idea than trying to use my incandescent light bulbs as "heaters".
Agree?
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---MIKE--- wrote:

Yep. I ran across an article on fluorescent bulb lifespan a while back. As with incandescent bulbs, turning them on and off is what shortens the life. If the fluorescent is on 24/7 you'll get the rated hours. If it's on say a third of that time, you'll get about half of the rated hours (please note all of my numbers are either right or wrong or somewhere in between, but the gist of it is correct). The article calculated that if you were going to be back in the room in a half hour it made more sense to just leave the light on. This is one of the stumbling blocks to those automated motion-sensor lights.
The compact fluorescents have healthy warranties - years, so just give the manufacturer a call.
R
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Not much with incandescents. CFs lose about 6 minutes with each start.

Sounds wrong, at 10 cents/kWh and $2 for a 6-7K hour bulb.
Nick
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snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

Incandescent bulbs primarily fail due to the power surge at startup. Turning them off and on definitely shortens the life.

You edited out this part of what I wrote: "(please note all of my numbers are either right or wrong or somewhere in between, but the gist of it is correct)"
I was certain that would have stopped the bean counters from counting beans. My error.
R
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Not much. Don Klipstein might have something to say about this.

Your gist is WRONG! Try the numbers, for a 14 W CF.
Nick
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wrote:

Then you have to keep records of every bulb in use. Figure out a way to label the bulbs so as to be able to associate them with the correct records. Complex record-keeping is one way that people get less value from warranties than they should. It's too easy to throw away the "trash" that came with that bulb you installed.
--
35 days until the winter solstice celebration

Mark Lloyd
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Fluorescents are normally rated for 3 hours per start. I wish compact fluorescents were normally rated for 1 hour per start.
Meanwhile, most incandescents do not suffer much damage from starting. Even though they usuallie die during a cold start - what mainly happens is that aging incandescents become unable to survive a cold start a little while before they become unable to survive continuous operation, due to temperature overshoot of a thin spot on the filament. More details in http://www.misty.com/~don/bulb1.html
I once tested one of those "stick on buttons" claimed to double the life of an incandescent, for voltage drop. It dimmed a 100 watt incandescent enough to increase its life a good 50%.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Unfortunately, dimming incandescents results in even more power consumed per unit of light produced.
Bob
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Yes, well enough known! Power consumption varies with applied RMS voltage to the 1.5 to 1.57 power or so, while light output varies with applied RMS voltage to roughly the 3.4 power (more with more severe dimming). That means light output goes down slightly worse than square of power input, or energy efficiency varying slightly more than proportionately with square root of light output (roughly light output to the .55 power, more for severe dimming). As in to dim to 50% of light output, power input is maybe about 73% of "full".
Since most of the cost of operating incandescents is normally electricity cost, I would put some work into increasing the energy efficiency. As in making some bulbs turn off when you want less light.
When dimming is done with a resistor (as opposed to a variable transformer or the usual waveform-chopping "phase control" circuit that usually has a triac), the energy efficiency story gets worse. To count power consumed by the infected lamp and the resistor, power consumption is typically proportional to the lamp's RMS voltage to the .5-.57 power. This means power conmsumption goes down about 1/6 as much as light output does (when the percentages are small). The "stick-on button" that dimmed a 100 watt incandescent lamp enough to increase its life 50% also reduced the light output by about 11% while power consumption by the lamp and the "button" was about 98.2 watts (decreased about 1.8%). Better to just use a longer life incandescent. Depending on application, often (probably usually) better still to use a compact fluorescent!
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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But don't longer life incandescents do the exact same thing as your "button", giving you less lumens per watt?
--
Peace,
BobJ



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I just buy them from Walmart. Lifetime warranty.
--
Steve Barker



"RicodJour" < snipped-for-privacy@worldemail.com> wrote in message
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Steve Barker LT wrote:

You will find a distribution, I did my whole new addtion with them[ say 15 bulbs or more] and lost 2 or 3 pretty quick[months] and none since[2+ years]
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Couple of years ago a paper reported that an regular light bulb has been lit in the loft of the NY Opera House for forty years as nobody knows where the switch is to turn it off.
wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@vcoms.net wrote:

I have heard of lightbulbs lasting a century. Actually easy to do - run a 230V European incandescent bulb at 120V. Problem is, such longlife bulbs produce much less light for a given amout of electricity consumption than "standard" incandescents.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Don Klipstein wrote:

Try this:
http://www.centennialbulb.org /
Happy Thanksgiving,
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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---MIKE--- wrote:

Only one of dozens has failed me in 5-7 years, a "Lights of America" or
some-such no-name. Of course, I use them wherever a light would not be short-cycled- where it would be left on for some time, or off. Bottom line: only bathrooms now have incandescents.
True, the one on the porch can take a while to get to full output. Not a problem to me.
Meanwhile, each succeeding generation of them seems better than the previous.
I tried some 40W reflector incandescents in some recessed fixtures; their longevity was a few months, on average. Maybe resulting from slight vibration walking on floor above?
J
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snipped-for-privacy@sme-online.com wrote:

Agree. LOA not lasted well for me either
I HAVE had god luck with the ones that Costco sells tho.
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