TV tuner cards

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Some of us still drive an old carbureted car with manual transmission and NOTHING computerized on it. There's a bit more involved than poking the gas and brake. Just getting it to start is an achievement! :)

1. Connect hose. 2. Screw on nozzle. 3. Turn on water. 4. Aim nozzle and squeeze.

That's called a stick shift. :)

Mine is always on the same station, so it automatically selects the right station every time I turn it on.
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
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On 4/2/2016 9:37 PM, HerHusband wrote:

Yup. Despite being what I do for a living, the idea of facing all of those electronics in SWMBO's vehicle is intimidating! And, thinking that some grease monkey knows which end is UP is laughable!
I'm wondering how the "push to start" feature handles an ignition problem??
("Check Engine"?)

Aren't you implicitly telling your irrigation controller (i.e., yourself) when to water and how much to water?

Sadly, while SWMBO's car *seems* to track "my settings" vs. "her settings" (based on which key is used to start the vehicle), it does NOT seem to adjust the "current selection" for the entertainment system! It *does* remember her stations vs. mine, her auto-headlight sensitivity vs. mine, etc. But, it just can't seem to remember that she listens to the radio/CD while I listen to a thumb drive!
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On Saturday, April 2, 2016 at 1:10:01 PM UTC-4, Don Y wrote:

Sounds like you're ready for products like that $300 Nest Thermostat. Where instead of you telling it what temps you want and at what times, it guesses based on motion sensors, detecting patterns, etc. Then when you take the day off from work sick, set the temp to 75F, you find out 3 hours later it's back to 60F, because the thermostat knows better and you can't tell it to stop screwing around. And you never know what it's really doing, is going to do next, etc, because it's all based on what the thermostat thinks it should do, as opposed to you telling it what to do. Me, I'll stick with a traditional programmable thermostat, because I can figure out how to program it. Same thing with a DVR. I have a Tivo, like millions of other people and no problem figuring out how to set it up. I guess you want one where it tells you what to watch.
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wrote:

"Easy" is just buying a Tivo.
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Per snipped-for-privacy@aol.com:

The Tivo I tried some years ago *really* impressed me with the simplicity/elegance of it's interface and setup.... only reason I returned it was the EPG charge.
Since settled into SageTV and it does almost everything I want.... but I still have to give Tivo credit.
--
Pete Cresswell

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I just have the one computer running everything, so it's the only box that runs 24/7 also.

11? Wow, that sounds expensive, and space hungry.

I have a Cyberpower CP1500PFCLCD for my computer, monitor, cable modem, and router.
My network switch is not on a UPS, since all the stuff that accesses it goes out when the power goes off anyway.

My UPS isn't running very long these days before it shuts down (about 10 minutes max). I replaced the batteries last year (cheap knockoffs) but it didn't help. I just ordered new genuine Cyberpower batteries to give it another try. If it doesn't help I plan to buy a larger UPS and delegate this UPS to lesser importance devices.

That switch must have a large power supply in order to power all 72 ports?

With that many devices, I can see why your network powered system would be a smart idea.

We dropped the standard telephone service years ago. They were charging over $100 a month, provided no caller ID or other services, and only local calling to our little town. All of our family and businesses we dealt with were long distance.
Once we got cable internet, I switched to VOIP for about $20 a month, full services, voice mail, and free long distance anywhere in the country.

Kudo's to you for thinking big. I don't think most people need that kind of thing in a typical home environment. As it is, my wife thinks I've gone overboard with my simple setup. :)
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
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Hi Anthony,
On 4/2/2016 6:55 AM, HerHusband wrote:

There'd be no practical way of me getting all the field wiring *into* one computer!
So, the little 24/7/365 box just provides the "core services" that all of the other boxes need when they come online. The same approach is implemented by the RDBMS server in my automation system (it's the only place where things can be "remembered")

Most of my machines are too big to be able to put them on a shared UPS (and be able to power more than one up at a time). The UPS's also act as "outlet multipliers" and "common power switches" -- I'll plug a workstation and its attached peripherals into *one* UPS; the next workstation (and *its* peripherals) into the next UPS, etc. So, a workstation appears to have a single power cord instead of many.
E.g., the workstation on which I prepare my documentation has the PC, a film scanner, an A-size scanner and a B-size scanner attached to it along with a DLT. Each, of course, has a power cord. When I'm done with that workstation, I can push the power button on the UPS and ensure that all are powered off. In the event of an electrical storm, I can unplug the UPS and know all of those devices are isolated from the mains.
Repeat this for the CAD workstation, multimedia workstation, each of the two Sun workstations, SWMBO's computer, the 1U servers share a UPS (because they have few I/O's and are never powered up together) and the 2U servers share another (same logic). This email/WWW machine has its own UPS as does that little DNS box.
As my monitors are "shared" between workstations (I connect each monitor to two workstations and then use the A/B switches on the monitor front panels to select which workstation's output I am viewing), they can't be plugged into a "workstation-specific" UPS (cuz the UPS for that particular workstation might be powered off while the workstation that is supplying video is powered on!). So, there's another UPS that just keeps the monitors "up".
Another does the same for the NAS boxes (again, they aren't associated with any *particular* workstation so can't logically be tied to a particular UPS)
The expense comes in the form of the batteries. :< Buying them in lots of 20 helps with the price. But, it's not the sort of purchase that I enjoy making!
For the most part, I just need the UPS's to bridge short brownouts and blinkouts. Actual, prolonged outages are very rare, here. (OTOH, a single "blink" can screw up the rendering of a multimedia presentation or the layout of a printed circuit board; the price of a battery is a pittance compared to the time lost!)

Ditto for the office. My only risk, there, is a file transfer to/from a NAS, FTP service, etc. And, as those things are under my control, I can always restart them at a later time.
The automation system, however, is a different story. I can't afford to lose telephone, HVAC controls, security, etc. just because the power glitched. And, having everything reboot can quickly lead to inconvenience (though I can boot everything in less time than a PC takes to get up and running -- the RDBMS being the slowpoke in the lot)

The PoE switch supplies 48V to the devices on the ends of the network drops. So, having a 48V *battery* in the UPS (instead of the 24V batteries in my current UPS's) seems like it should be more effective at keeping things "up" when the power is out.

Yes. Worst case, about 1100W (in addition to what the switch uses itself). But, that assumes each port is drawing the maximum 15W that I can deliver over the network. I don't use that sort of power on every port (imagine a dozen bookshelf speakers consuming 15W?? A dozen IP cameras consuming 15W each??).

It's the only way all of that distributed kit can be practical! if each device had its own "local" power supply, you'd always have to wonder if a (remote) power supply had failed and that was the reason why you couldn't "talk" to a remote node. With control of the power 8at* the switch, I can know that power *is* being delivered (diagnostics in the switch) so if the remote node isn't responding then it's cable has been cut *or* it is fried. I.e., you can skip the "is the device plugged in?" part of the troubleshooting.
Imagine in an office or "institution"... someone unplugging a wall wart and crippling a device! (Consider the implications if that device was providing a security function!)

We have no long distance needs. We used to buy $20 "calling cards" (2c/minute) but found that we couldn't use them up in the ~year allowed.
I think our local phone is ~$30/month and SWMBO's cell phone is another $8-10. For the few times when she wants to phone her sister, she'll use the surplus minutes on her cell phone -- to help burn off the "balance".

Cable, here, has a bad reputation for service and availability. Most folks drop the service and switch to Dish for TV and DSL for ISP. You can see the number of homes that have had wire problems as the cable company just lays a cable ON the soil and promises to send someone around to bury it, "soon". Their idea of "soon" apparently differs from most folks'! (i.e., years!)

I spent most of my career addressing *markets*. Now, I address *needs*.
My goal is to demonstrate how you can "design for accessibility" as the number of "deficiencies" (avoiding the term "disabilities") that are apparent in the population suggests that's a common problem (7% of men are color blind; 10% of men over 50 develop essential tremor; diabetes and macular degeneration costs folks their vision; age costs folks their mobility; Parkinson's; ALS; etc.)
But, a "white paper" approach would just be received as "gee, that's interesting" with no real consequential followup. A "token" application trivializes the effort involved and the impact (design an alarm clock that can be used by people with any/all of these "deficiencies").
So, I needed a substantial project to illustrate different challenges (to the user interface) and how they could be consistently addressed. And, something that is "exciting"/interesting (no one cares about an "accessible clock"!). Put someone *in* a "device" with which they can interact in a variety of ways and most folks want to poke at it to see what it can do, what its limitations are, how it addresses particular situations, etc.
It becomes a MEMORABLE experience. So, hopefully, they take that memory with them as they begin to address *their* designs. And, maybe, think about the assumptions that they implicitly "encode" in those products.
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On 3/30/2016 7:17 PM, Terry Coombs wrote:

Hauppauge Colossus 2. Add an HDCP stripper between the HDMI output of the cable or satellite box and the Hauppauge Colossus 2.
<http://www.hauppauge.com/site/webstore2/webstore_colossus2.html <(Amazon.com product link shortened)>
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