TV signal Amplifiers . What do u look for when buying one ?

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On Thu, 15 Nov 2007 21:50:27 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

Note that if you're having problems, it could be caused by a too-strong signal rather than a too-weak one. Then, you need to remove an amp or add an attenuator (Radio Shack may still sell those, as well as amps).
BTW, a difference of 3db is a 2:1 power ratio.
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On Thu, 15 Nov 2007 16:48:28 -0800 (PST), IbeDavid

It is really the antenna that determines performance on weak signals.
You need enough signal from the antenna to operate just one TV down inside the house.
A booster amplifier can compensate for splitting the antenna signal cable run into extra cable runs to more locations - as in more TV's than just the one.
Ross
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In theory but in practice you get to much attenuation and noise introduction from the transmission line. An amplifier mounted at the pre-noise source (antenna) goes a long way in nullifying these negative factors.
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On Fri, 16 Nov 2007 09:10:28 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

True, although is seemed as if the OP already had a noisy signal at the antenna, so had no way to put an amp pre-noise source.
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On Fri, 16 Nov 2007 06:57:06 GMT, ebff snipped-for-privacy@lnubb.pbz (RMD) wrote:

Although the signal does need to be of adequate quality. If you can not get a decent picture on a single TV located at the antenna, no amount of amplification will help.

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On Fri, 16 Nov 2007 06:57:06 GMT, ebff snipped-for-privacy@lnubb.pbz (RMD) wrote:

What I was meaning to say, but didn't say it very well, is that the signal amplifier can really only compensate for cable/splitter losses.
It won't pull a good signal out of a noisy signal.
Only a good well-sited antenna can make a clean signal in the first place.
Ross
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ebff snipped-for-privacy@lnubb.pbz (RMD) wrote:

A signal is only noisy in the context of how it is received. You have to look at the whole system - the antenna, the feedline and distribution, and the receiver. All of them contribute to the system noise figure. A properly placed amplifier (meaning at the antenna) can overcome the noise contributed by the rest of the system. But if you don't have enough signal to overcome the noise in the amplifier, it won't make any difference how much you amplify. The only solution there is to put in a better antenna, or get an amplifier with a lower noise figure. At some point, the best amplifier in the world won't overcome the lack of signal from an inadequate antenna.
I don't own any really new TV equipment - it's all 5-15 years old, but there are definite differences in the various units' sensitivity. I suspect that is true in current equipment also. For quite a while receivers have primarily been designed to work with the higher signal levels of cable or satellite receiver signals, with off-the-air use being secondary. A good amplifier will definitely improve these.

Very true. Put up the best antenna you can - makes everything else easier.
Roger Grady snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.qlfit.net To reply by email, remove "qlfit." from address
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On Thu, 15 Nov 2007 16:48:28 -0800 (PST), IbeDavid

An amplifier could help with loss in a long lead in, if placed right next to the antenna (they make amps for this, that get power through the coax). An amplifier WILL NOT clear up an already noisy signal. You may need a better (or at least properly placed) antenna.
The situation is complicated, and the amp MAY still help a little. You could try one that can be returned to the store. Antenna aiming is more likely to help.
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On Thu, 15 Nov 2007 16:48:28 -0800, IbeDavid wrote:

The best way to do that is with a better antenna mounted as high as possible. Also, any amp needs to be mounted on the antenna mast as close to the antenna's feed as possible or you will be amplifying signal plus noise from the feed line. I'm a licensed Extra class ham radio operator who has talked half way around the world on 1 watt of power so I think I'm qualified to give expert advice on this subject :)
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