TV repairable?

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On 1/17/2011 7:51 PM, aemeijers wrote:

I have the same 19" Dell Trinitron. Got lucky at a Salvation Army store about 9 or 10 years ago, I think the price was $17. ... the same as all the 14" ones! I grabbed it fast! I know the feeling of looking at the big flat screens. When will this monitor die? When I get a flat screen I'll be able to move my desk 7" back against the wall. I almost cut a hole in the wall behind this thing a couple times, but then to make it worth it, I'd have to cut a hole in my bedroom wall also.
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Tony Miklos wrote:

Hi, I dumped Nikon film outfit after using it for my daughter's wedding. Now every member of my family has own digital camera, and/or camcorder. One thing, CRT based sets has a slight risk of emitting X-ray if HV set up is not properly adjusted. Also they use quite a bit more energy compared to LCD panels.
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wrote:

me either.

Heh,when the ATSC converters first came out,I picked up a nice 13" CRT set that a neighbor had tossed out,it works fine with a converter,has a nice picture.
I don't like the flat panel 16:9 sets,they don't display the aspect ratios properly,if you see a circle on them,it's flattened,and people look squished down. I have yet to see a flat panel that doesn't do that. If I had to buy a new TV tomorrow,I'd buy a CRT set,no bigger than 25",if they can still be found.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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Jim Yanik wrote:
[snip]

Every widescreen TV should have a button to switch between 16:9 and 4:3 ratios.
Mine does, and includes a "panoramic" mode that shows EVERYTHING distorted.
[snip]
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us
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On 1/17/2011 2:31 PM, Nancy Young wrote:

This seems extreme. If I remember correctly, your original post indicated that the problem only lasts about 15 min and then spontaneously disappears. Why trash the set when after 15 min it behaves normally?
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On 1/17/2011 9:24 PM, Peter wrote:

Uh, she wasn't the OP, she was just chiming in.
--
aem sends...

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On 1/17/2011 1:54 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I'd at least try leaving it out for the curb fairies, or list it on FreeCycle or Craig's list for free, before I did that. I feel guilty burying running hardware. If not running, most areas that are urbanized at all, have an annual electronics recycle day.
--
aem sends...

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Everyone has forgotten my original suggestion, loosen the back so the set runs cooler and see what happens. Also, if it is a bad capacitor, the problem would not appear, and then disappear somewhat later, but would be continually bad. It could be a cold solder joint, that opens upon a little heating, and then recloses after further heating. That's why I suggested opening the back and see what happens. It is easy for a non-electronics person to do and gives a lot of information!!!!
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On Mon, 17 Jan 2011 12:38:30 -0800 (PST), "hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net"

I've had monitors with very obviously bad (swelled) caps work intermittently for a long time before they quit for good. Motherboards too.
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On 1/17/2011 3:38 PM, hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

You are incorrect about the capacitor. I've seen it happen over and over for 30+ years now.
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wrote:

don't
<<Everyone has forgotten my original suggestion, loosen the back so the set runs cooler and see what happens. Also, if it is a bad capacitor, the problem would not appear, and then disappear somewhat later, but would be continually bad. It could be a cold solder joint, that opens upon a little heating, and then recloses after further heating. That's why I suggested opening the back and see what happens. It is easy for a non-electronics person to do and gives a lot of information!!!!>>
It's been a long time since I've opened up a CRT for anything but don't you need a cheater cord to bypass the line cord safety interlock? Not even sure where you'd find one locally, now that RatShack morphed into a phone store. YMMV, but I wouldn't send a novice into the back of an open big CRT unit with a metal freon can. That's asking for a zapping. Just opening it up might not change the thermodynamics enough to spot a bad component.
I agree with your assessment about the cause of the problem, though. Back in the days when I did repair stuff like that, I found it was usually a cracked solder joint that caused these sorts of "warm up" problems. The OP's unit corrects itself when on for a while, and that's the opposite of what I would expect from a bad cap. It *is* what I would expect from a bad joint that heated enough to expand to eventually make good contact. Transformer mounting via solder joints (and not bolting) were always a trouble spot, especially if it was in an area that was not well supported and could flex. Flexion plagues all sorts of electronics. Early PC motherboard suffered from it and a Sony receiver I recently repaired had a mainboard that had flexed enough through many moves to loosen a ground screw enough to induce a horrific hum.
I am waiting for my remaining CRTs to burn up or implode so I can replace them with LCDs but it's sort of like driving to work and waiting for a stop light so you can fiddle with the radio. That's the day you'll not hit a single red light. Same with the CRTs. Now that I *want* them to die, they are holding on with a vengeance. I recently trashed an RCA 25" super basic color model that ran for over 25 years (and was still running except that the picture had enlarged a bit and it wasn't nearly as vivid as new). Had those old individual varactor tuning controls for each channel behind a big swinging door. Came with a bag of teeny little channel number labels. Fortunately, it spent most of its life connected to a VCR via channel 3.
-- Bobby G.
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On 1/19/2011 12:36, Robert Green wrote:

I hope that the "CRT" you're referring to is the whole TV set and not the picture tube. Opening it can be fatal -- for both you and the tube.
I can't recall seeing a TV with a back cover interlock in over 30 years! I find that somewhat bizarre considering all the safety features included in modern TVs. They must figure that if you're going to remove all the screws to get the back cover off, any interlock won't stop a qualified person (or fool) from powering the set. There are more warning labels than ever before, however.
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you
sure
store.
up
Yes, I should have specified "devices with CRTs" - no one wants a head full of glass splinters.

Like I said, it's been a long time I've been into anything with a CRT. Considering all the other nanny-state garbage there is to put up with, it certainly seems unusual that they did away with the need for cheater cords. Some of my earliest memories are of my dad turning the huge DuMont TV around to undo the perforated masonite back to look for dark tubes and other gremlins and the look of horror on my mom's face.
-- Bobby G.
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Robert Green wrote:

Cheater cord? Just remove the clip which holds the cord to the back panel. Then you can plug back in the cord w/o panel and turn on the set.
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On 1/20/2011 3:54 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

That was funny to read. I haven't heard "cheater cord" in so long, I could just hear my Dad saying it 40 years ago (not that he stopped saying it then, that's just were my memory took me).
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Put it on the curb with a largish note: "WORKS!"
The Urban Fairies (or Underpants Gnomes) will disappear it.
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wrote:

Either that or the little buggers will smash it and you are left picking up peices. A few brats in the neighbourhood would tie any computer monitor or small TV left at the curb behind their bicycles and drag them around the block a few times till there was not much left.
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On 1/17/2011 4:29 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Sorry, I didn't know I was in your neighborhood. I think I'm the only 49 year old still doing that stuff. ;-)
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aemeijers wrote:

Do you even have to ask that question? It was a joke, or a troll; chuckle, ignore, and move on.
Jon
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In considering a new tv a 32 will be more equivilant in height to your 27, you will be unhappy with a new 27. You can get a new 32 for 300, and have HD, a digital HD tuner, and alot lot better picture, I would not fix it, whats next to break. A new 32 might also use 1/4- 1/2 the power as your clunker
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