TV repairable?

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On 1/17/2011 7:45 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

I usually work for peasants and small merchants, I haven't done any work for the royal family. :-)
TDD
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On 1/17/2011 5:55 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

I charge $85/hr for electronics, phone systems, network systems, access control, computer repair, alarm systems, etc. Any low voltage is that rate. The more mundane and simpler stuff is $65/hr. But for good customers, the rate is flexible and someone who spends a lot of money with me in a year gets a lot of favors. Besides, if they own a restaurant, I never go hungry. I do a lot of national contract installation and repairs too. Tomorrow, I'll be with some other guys on a scissors lift pulling in 500 feet of MC cable to run two circuits up in a 20 foot ceiling. I hope I can breath OK tomorrow.
TDD
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On 1/17/2011 8:46 AM, Jeff Thies wrote:

Yes caps in switching power supplies are common problems. Usually from ESR (equivalent series resistance) which shows up with high frequencies, like in switching power supplies. Many common replacement caps will already be failing that test but work for a while. They make special caps for circuits sensitive to ESR.
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On 1/17/2011 5:06 AM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

One particular monitor with cap problems had 2 caps parallel. I think the one was 100uf and the other 220uf. I'd find them on my bench where they had been replaced with one 330uf cap. Sometimes they worked, and sometimes they didn't. I don't claim to know why but I always guessed it had something to do with ESR.
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On Mon, 17 Jan 2011 04:06:37 -0600, The Daring Dufas wrote:

In a CRT TV environment, yes, not too bad - it does get pretty toasty inside a TV, and heat's a real killer. I've got many computers that are 30 years old and still working without any capacitor issues though; a lot of it depends on the environment and how close the working voltage is to the limit of the capacitor.
At the place where I used to work, we had a computer from the early 60s and that was still running with many of the original capacitors in the power supplies (although some of them had been replaced over the years as they went bad). Not bad for electronics that was pushing 50 years old, though.

The modern stuff really doesn't seem to be built as well, that much is true. And the less said about modern-era PCs and "capacitor plague" the better :-)
cheers
Jules
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On 1/18/2011 7:52 AM, Jules Richardson wrote:

I have an original IBM PC or two somewhere that still worked the last time it/they was/were turned on. The originals were built like tanks with high quality components that were of at least commercial grade specs. The 4 to 5 thousand dollar price tag of the computers was not really that far out of line considering the low production volume and build quality. The quality of PC's didn't really slip until they became commodity items and were produced in massive quantities. A good example is the Delco 8-track tape players that were installed in GM vehicles years ago. The Delco player was a substantially robust unit built with very high quality components. When the market became flooded with tons of cheaply made imported tape players, no one wanted to pay the price for the expensive Delco units. It's like anything else, you can buy an electronic item that will last and last but it will cost a whole lot more than your typical consumer electronic unit.
TDD
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On Tue, 18 Jan 2011 09:38:18 -0600, The Daring Dufas wrote:

If you ever feel like parting with them, shout - although I suspect shipping costs might be phenominal, even within the US :-)
I had an original PC (the 5150) and also an XT (5160) but got rid of them before moving over to the US as I was trying to cut down on weight of things to ship over - I've always regretted losing them, though. It took me a while to get hold of them as they were down on the insurance policy of the original owners as still being worth several thousand bucks, despite my getting them in the early 90s - so I know exactly what you mean about the price tag ;-)
My pair had a (very) minor claim to fame in that they were used for photos in Gordon Laing's "Digital Retro" book - I remember running around like a nut on the morning of the shooting trying to find a full complement of case screws, as they'd all gone walkabout over the years :-)

true, although IBM's design and choice of CPU was always a bit questionable, and sales relied on marketing pressure more than anything. "mechanically" they were very good, though.

I've never had an 8-track - I should really get one for the old truck. They weren't particularly common back in the UK; older vehicles had radios only, and later made the jump to compact cassette.

I'm not sure it's always true, though. There comes a point where you just can't throw money at the problem because no company is able to make a quality product and still survive in the marketplace, so the product that you want doesn't exist; the only solution is to keep existing better- engineered products going, or to completely make from scratch (but good luck with doing something like that with a PC, say :-)
Maybe it's always been like that, but it seems more true in these times of low-quality products on short replacement cycles.
cheers
Jules
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On 1/18/2011 3:32 PM, Jules Richardson wrote:

It's interesting to note that cheap electronics can be reliable because of integrated circuits. If a cheaply made item were made from discrete components, the MTBF of the individual cheap components would be horrid.
TDD
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On Tue, 18 Jan 2011 21:32:56 +0000 (UTC), Jules Richardson

I still have my "first day purchase" 5150, both monochrome and color monitors, and an expansion unit and 10MB hard disk. The single-sided drive is long gone (I think). It's also got 704K of memory in it.

It was a business decision (Intel vs. Motorola), not marketing.

You can't have high quality and high prices and billions sold (see: McDonalds). There *will* be a race to the bottom. Particularly in this case, I don't see that as a problem.
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On Sun, 16 Jan 2011 23:25:37 -0500, Tony Miklos

deflection circuit. MOST likely capacitor related, but there are numerous other components that can cause it - some of which are more temperature sensitive than capacitors - and bad solder joints do fit the category.
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On 1/17/2011 8:17 AM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

In my findings 99.9% of the time it was a bad cap, and while at it I changed other caps that had a history of failing. I've also found caps, especially ones that suffer from ESR are very temperature sensitive.
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On 1/16/2011 18:18, PE wrote:

This looks like a problem with the automatic degaussing circuit. Electromagnets are energized when power is first applied to remove any stray magnetic fields from the CRT. The degausser should be deactivated by the time the CRT warms up. Usually a thermistor (a fairly inexpensive component) is the culprit. If you have service information (e.g. a schematic) you may be able to fix it inexpensively.
But, as others have pointed out, it's not economically practical to put much effort into repairing such a technologically obsolete device.
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the set has one). This allows you to set the edges of the picture so they are vertical (and horizontal), and not bowed inwards or outwards. The adjustment control could be a small preset potentiometer, which has a dirty (intermittent) contact. A quick twiddle might clear the problem.
However, the problem might be any of the components or soldered joints in that part of the circuit. I recall that, when it was 6 months old, my 18" Sony suddenly developed pincushion distortion, and this turned out to be a small, faulty 10 microfarad capacitor. Diagnosis was only an 'inspired guess', but replacement fixed it.
But, as others have said, unless you're really into electronics, maybe it's time to treat yourself to a new, flat-screen set. If you spend some time carefully setting up the picture, you'll quickly become accustomed to the 'different' picture quality - and maybe eventually learn to like it!
--
Ian

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PE wrote:

Check the model and chassis number online, there are a number of databases describing faults common with various models. Ask on sci.electronics.repair, they may have a general idea.
Jon
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Probably a tube is getting weak. Remove the back, label all the tubes for location on the chassis, so you can put them back in the same socket. Pull out all tubes and take them to your local drugstore or hardware store and test them in their tube tester. Replace any bad ones and you should have a good working tv for several more years.
Jack
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On Sun 16 Jan 2011 11:32:32p, told us...

I haven't seen a tube tester in a drugstore or hardware store in years, nor have I seen a television made in the last 15 years that had more than a picture tube. The remaining circuitry was solid state.
--

~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

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ㅗㅑ
Wayne Boatwright wrote:

We are talking about tube set? Whoa! I have a tube tester real professional one. I use it very often working/repairing guitar amps.
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On Sun 16 Jan 2011 11:57:13p, Tony Hwang told us...

I can't believe the OP has a tube set, and I don't recall it being said. Most sets made in the last 15 years were solid state except for the CRT.
--

~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~
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On 1/17/2011 2:05 AM, Wayne Boatwright wrote:

I think it was a joke.
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?

A flashback to 1963, brought to you by Jack. Thanks for the chuckle.
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