Turning off water main: shutdown water heater first?

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I want to turn off my water main to repair an outside faucet. Do I have to shutdown the water heater first? And after I turn the water back on, do I have to do something to "reboot" the water heater?
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No need to shutdown the water heater, as long as your not draining it. Most times when you shut off the water main, water will remain in the HW heater tank.
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No need to turn off the WH.
Just turn off the main and open as many faucets as you need to drain the system so you don't get the system full of water draining out of the one fixture you're working on.
As long as you are fixing the spigot, why not install a shut off for it so you don't have to turn off the whole house next time - or even in the winter?
One more tip: when you turn the main back on, turn it on full and then close it about an 1/4 turn - assmuning it's a compression style with a rotary handle. This gives you room to "play" if the main freezes up due to corrosion in the future. If you open it all the way against the stop, you won't have any "wiggle room" if it gets stuck.
This tip holds true for all compression style shut-offs, but is not (typically) a concern for ball valves.
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You made it worthwhile booting up my computer today. Thanks for an excellent tip.
Nonny
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I was told it's full open minus half turn. So the next guy, if he turns it the wrong way. It will turn "some" so that he knows it's not a corroded and frozen valve stem. Then he will (maybe) figure out to turn it the other way.
Works on globe, gate, and angle valves. Ball valves don't have a half turn of play to work with.
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james wrote the following:

valve in the line so you don't have to shut down the whole house next time. Unless there is a shutoff valve there already and you can't find it. I have multiple shut off valves for everything that dispenses water in the house. Besides the ones under the sinks, bath, shower, toilets, or outside faucets, I have separate shut off valves in the source lines in the basement. If I have to remove the water softener, I have shutoff and bypass valves going into and out off the water softener, so the rest of the house does not have to do without water. It's similar to the the breaker box. You don't have to shut off the main breaker to repair an outlet, fixture, or switch.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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re: "After you repair what is wrong with the outside faucet, put a shutoff valve in the line..."
Why can't he put the shutoff valve in first? ;-)
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DerbyDad03 wrote the following:

I debated about that, but "before you repair the faucet, put a shutoff valve in the line" just 'sounded' a little clumsy, although feasible. :-)
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Although I was kind of kidding, now that I think about itactually makes sense:
Depending on the layout, the OP might be able to cut the pipe inside the house, pull the old spigot out, put a shutoff on the interior pipe and install a frost proof spigot through the wall, into the shutoff.
Granted, that's a complete upgrade rather than a simple repair, but an upgrade that might be worth the extra work/cost.
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On 05/28/2010 10:34 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

if you install a shutoff with a little waste cap, and/or make sure that the pipe from the shutoff to the spigot angles down slightly, you don't need a frostproof spigot.
nate
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wrote:

So that you can drain the spigot each fall? That's what I have now, and I have to do it each fall! And I have to remember. And if I need water, there is none until spring. And it's getting harder and harder to open the cap, and to shut it, plus I've given up trying to catch the water that comes out when I open it.
I'm sure it's not always worth the effort, but I wouldn't discourage a frostproof spigot.

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To "reboot" instal the CD that came with it.
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Oh no...now he'll be posting back asking where he can download the activation key.
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Most WH, the serial number is the activation key.
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Most WH manufacturers have the software as a free download.
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james wrote:

You should turn off the heater. Under normal circumstances, the water stays in the tank and is not a problem. But what about abnormal circumstances? Like you get distracted, or hurt...and the tank drains.
It takes two seconds to flip the switch to off. Why not take the precaution???
And that goes for any kind of repair. Don't skip simple steps that make the process safer or less vulnerable to screw-ups.
And before the villages light the torches to come after me, let me say... The fact that the statistical probability of having a problem is near zero is small comfort when it actually happens to you.
And after I turn the water back on,

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== In addition to all of the other posting in reply, if you have a hot water tank heated by NG, you can just turn the control to PILOT for the time being while doing the repair. After the repair , just turn it back to the original setting. ==
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What Roy was going to write, also. The white knob on top of the gas valve turns to pilot. Don't have to adjust the black knob on the side of the controls.
For electric WH, look in your panel box for a double 30 breaker.
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On May 27, 5:29pm, "Stormin Mormon"

That makes me wonder a little.
Do you really want to flip that breaker under load? Yeah, it's designed to trip under load, but not all that many times.
Not saying it's wrong, just wondering about it. When I worked in a factory we were careful never to flip a breaker under load, always powered down first.
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The others have written much what I would have written.
It is a good idea to shut off the WH, though it's likely not a problem. Unlikely to need any reboot. Small chance that a gas WH pilot light may blow out. The provided software disk will help with rebooting. Insert disk before powering up.
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