Turned off main water valve, some water still running?

In order to repair the bathtub faucets, I turned off the main water valve (outside, near the meter, etc.) since we don't have any inside controls for the bathub.
Water continues to run at a fairly steady pace (more than a drip or a trickle) from that bathtub in question. But NOT from any of the other faucets in the house (kitchen, other bathtub, bathroom sinks) - only the one I want to work on. We left it for 2 hours and it was still running - equal hot and cold. None of the other faucets will work at all, and the outside valve is turned as far as it will go.
What is going on?
Totally confused, and thankful for any guidance....
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Steve Portigal wrote:

Don't you have another valve where the water pipe enters the house? Usually the water shut off is not done at the water meter,but at a secondary valve at the house. You could try to relieve some of the pressure in the pipe your working on by opening some of the other faucets. What exactly are you doing with the shower faucet?
Rich
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Sorry - I guess that's what I meant - it's outside, a few feet from the water meter itself (I was trying to differentiate between THAT valve and the City Access valve, etc. etc.).
You could try to relieve some of the pressure in the pipe

They are basic stem faucets and they are leaking - wanted to take 'em out, replace the washers or O-rings, and put 'em back in. Nothing fancy...
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Turn off the meter.
If your shut off valve is an old gate valve, it should probably be replaced. They are prone to deposits or debris keeping the gate from closing fully and it is not rare for them to snap the stem leaving you with no way to open the gate.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing. . . . DanG

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Steve Portigal wrote:

The bathtub just happens to be the lowest fixture. Try opening an outside hose tap (sillcock) and see if that is low enough to divert the flow.
The other option is to loosen one of the unions on the meter and let it drip from there (done at your own risk).
Consider cutting in one or more shutoff valves; you could use ones with built-in compression fittings so no soldering req'd.
Jim
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If you shut the valves on that bathtub OFF, then can you get water out of any of the other faucets in the house?
If you can't, then you must have a poltergeist in your house, call Ghost Busters, 'cause I'm out of ideas..
If you can, then it's because the bathtub spout is the lowest water outlet in the house, and the outside valve is choking off the flow so much that opening the bathtub valves reduces the pressure to the point where water won't rise to the level of the higher outlets.
Anyway, if there's no other valves in the main line you can shut you could:
1. Fix the tub valves while that little bit of water is running if you can. You might want to shut off the hot water heater so the water isn't hot, or maybe there's a shutoff valve in the heater's supply line you could shut off.
2. Have the city Water Department come and shut the water off via their underground valve, then fix that shutoff valve (it probably needs new seals) and have them turn the water back on again.
3. See if you can rent a pipe freezing rig like one of these:
http://www.northstate.com/ridgid/en-us/dept_152.html
4. Give up and call in a professional.
Happy New Year,
Jeff
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Jeff Wisnia (W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

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I guess that's worth a try - I'm not sure what that will be like, but it's not enough water to create much force, so that might be okay...
Thanks for the options...
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Connect a wet-dry vac to another valve (with duct tape) that is close to level with the tub or lower, open the valve and turn on the vac, it will suck the water over to the other valve and away from the one you want to work on.

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