Tubeless tire repair

My apologies if this is off topic. I could not find a spot to put it.
My problem is as follows. Some time back, I had purchased a Big Red Wagon from Northern tools. It has 4 pneumatic tires and good load capacity. Over the years, It has served me well.
The problem is that one of the pneumatic tires has gone flat, but without a puncture. This has happened once over the winter time, and after many attempts at trying to reinflate the tire, I gave up. I bought a brand new one for $25 USD, but it strikes me that there must be some way to reinflate the tire. It must have been done when manufactured!!
As it is, I have a tubeless tire with a a broad gap across the tire to the rim -- I cannot detemine a method to manipulate it so I can get the air to stay in and for it to seal up against the hub. Anyone have an idea? I would like to avoid buying a new tire again.
--dan
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What I do is; tie a small noose in a rope and loop the rope through it, then place the rope ring over the center of the tread & pull all the slack I can to V the tread and force the bead onto the rim. It works better if you have some way to hold the rim, like leaving it mounted. This is a crude and imperfect way to do it, but so far 100% effective.
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Don't forget to contact the manufacturer.
I had a tire go flat on a HD wheelbarrow. I couldn't inflate it so I called the manufacturer. They told me there is no way for a customer to reinflate the tire, but the tires are guaranteed for life. All I had to do is wait a few days for a new tire.
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If you want to stay tubeless: Force the tire beads toward the wheel rims by twisting a rope or belt around the centerline of the tire.
Remove the Schraeder valve from the fill point to let more air in faster.
Once you have the tire seated, replace Schraeder and give it a dose of SLIME or equal.
If you don't care about tubeless, get in innertube, pull out the valve core, reassemble and inflate. ______________________________ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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Another method that works well, especially with large tires, is to spray in some either into the gap and threo a match in. The bead gets sealed instantly enough to inflate normally

--
Free men own guns - www.geocities/CapitolHill/5357/

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Dan wrote:

I had the same problem and fought with it for 2 days without success. I took it down to a local tire shop and he had it fixed in a couple of minutes and charged $5. Money well spent!
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with.
aem sends....
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

I took my wheelbarrow tire to a shop that does small engine/lawnmower repairs and he didn't charge me anything for one minute of labor. Now I know where to take my lawnmower if it needs work.
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Has anyone tried the spray-in leak repair cans? One of my tractor tires deflates over a month or so. I just want to seal it up.
Dan wrote:

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I had a Murry mower that the rear tires kept going flat after sitting for a while. Let the air out tuil they were almost empty. Used about half a can in each tire, then mowed the yard. No more flats for several years.
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Gempler sells a tire sealing goo that is far better than others I've tried, especially on tractor tires.
--
Free men own guns - www.geocities/CapitolHill/5357/

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Dan wrote:

Anothe possible solution is to buy a tube. They don't leak as fast as tubless tires. Northern Tools sells tubes that will fit your tubeless tire.
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It needs to be "strapped" while being inflated to keep the edge on the rim.
Put a tube in it to avoid future strapping.
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Even a small tubeless tire like this or a wheel barrow tire is difficult to get the bead seated on the rim & inflate without either a really strong inrush of air, or somehow mechanically forcing the bead into contact with the rim while inflating. I have had good results using a ratcheting loading strap (the smaller 1" width for these small tires, not a 2" strap) around the circumference of the tire, and tighten it until the tire bead contacts the wheel rim on both sides. using some soapy water on the bead will also help.
--
No dumb questions, just dumb answers.
Larry Wasserman - Baltimore, Maryland - snipped-for-privacy@charm.net
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Dan wrote:

Take it to a local tire shop. In a few minutes and for a few bucks it will be fixed. Just did that with a wheelbarrow tire last year.
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I had a similar problem with pneumatic tires on my snow plow. I bought cans of "fix a flat" at an auto parts store. About two cans managed to plug the hole and fix the flat.
Dan wrote:

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