TSP & Diswashing powder

Page 1 of 2  
The two soap dispensers on my dishwasher contain 5 tablespoons each of diswashing powder.
Assuming 1 tbsp of TSP per load, the proper ratio then is 10:1
So you get a big mixing bowl, measure out the diswashing detergent and add 1/10th that amount of TSP. Mix thoroughly. Mix some more. Put the mixture back in detergent container*.
If you are of the opinion that only 1 teaspoon of TSP is appropriate for a load of dishes, then the dilution factor should be 30:1 (1 tablespoon = 3 teaspoons).
--------- * Cut an "X" in the top of the now-empty detergent box, using a funnel, pour your mixture back in the box. Heal the "X" cut with duct tape.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's a litle more than opinion. The water hardness and and other factors will affect the amount of TSP required. Your numbers are a good starting point though.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

its far easier to just add a little TSP to each load.....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Smitty Two wrote:

I was assuming that one filled the dispensers with powdered or liquid detergent then flung a teaspoon or tablespoon of TSP into the bowels of the machine. In so doing, the ratio would be 10:1 (or 30:1).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 17 Feb 2011 21:26:48 -0800, Smitty Two

Is owning half a machine like having that cow with a window in its belly so you can see what it's eaten and how far along it is in digesting it?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Smitty Two wrote:

One dispenser dumps its contents as you close the door. The other on the subsequent wash cycle.
Not thinking on the project much, I had been broadcasting the TSP additive into the machine just before closing the door which, of course, limited its action to the first wash cycle.
UPDATE
To the process of adding TSP to your dishwashing detergent. The previous method required measuring the quantity of detergent in a new box to calculate the amount of TSP to add to obtain the proper ration (10:1 - 30:1).
You need not measure the amount of detergent that goes into the mixing bowl cup-by-cup.
You can measure the box.
Multiply the length x width x height in inches to get the total cubic inches of detergent. There are almost 0.07 cups per cubic inch. So, if you have a box that's 10 x 3 x 10", you have 300 cubic inches of stuff or 300 x 0.07 21 cups.
For a 10:1 addition, add a scosch more than two cups of TSP to the mix.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
HeyBub wrote:

boxes are frequently not completely filled.
"contents may have settled during shipment"

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/18/2011 6:28 AM, HeyBub wrote:

I put ONE cup in my 75oz box and it works just fine. Not sure what the volume ratio is....
--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 18 Feb 2011 17:48:09 -0600, Steve Barker

What is all this stuff about adding tsp anyhow? Why? Tri-sodium phosphate? I thought it was for walls.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mm wrote:

Phosphates were removed from diswashing detergents last summer. Dishes are not getting sparkling clean as a result. Food sticks to fork tines, flatware is smoky dull, dried scum is abundant.
Adding a smidgen of TSP to the wash restores the luster, the gleam, the other-worldy beauty to otherwise lifeless eating utensils and dishes.
It's a miracle.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

TSP also leaves the interior of the machine sparkling.
honestly i was starting to feel like i was putting my dishes to be cleaned in a trash compactor......
my machine now sparkles too:)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/22/2011 9:22 PM, HeyBub wrote:

Shrug. I rinse dishes before I stack them in the sink, and load/run the dishwasher maybe once a week. I've never noticed any problems with current-issue liquid dishwasher soap.
--
aem sends...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

i stuff them in the machine as they get dirty and dont rinse.
why waste the water?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
aemeijers wrote:

Yep, that'll work.
There are those of us, however, who do not wash dishes before we put them in the dish washer. Neither do we hone our skill on hand-sawing boards before activating the Skil saw. We do not mow the lawn with a pair of scissors before breaking out the lawn mower.
I understand washing dishes by hand because they weren't getting clean in the dishwasher. Try NOT hand washing and adding TSP to the machine.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/23/2011 9:05 PM, HeyBub wrote:

Don't read more into my post than what I put in it. I RINSE them, I do not WASH them, before stacking them in other side of sink. As in 'run the side the food touched under the running water one pass'. I do this just to keep the stink down until I load the dishwasher. I keep them topside in sink so that I remember to run dishwasher. I also don't bother to UNload dishwasher until I need to run another load. Living alone and only eating maybe a dozen meals a week at home, I don't generate dishes very fast, so NOT rinsing them is not a good option- no DW can be expected to clean dried concrete very well.
Not slamming anyone who needs spiked DW detergents due to their habits and/or local water peculiarities. Just saying that with the water I have here, and my cheapy entry-level DW and lousy water pressure, liquid Cascade (I think, the bottle is green) works fine. I only fill the dispenser cup about 2/3 full, and don't use any rinse agents or anything. I also keep 'auto dry' turned off, and just crack the door after cycle ends. Perhaps baking the wet dishes is one thing that promotes spots? Not curious enough to experiment.
--
aem sends...


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Google is your friend: http://groups.google.com/group/alt.home.repair/browse_thread/thread/88a779e13cebc0bc/74255399e65d9e0c?q=dishwashing+tsp&lnk=ol &
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

As with many other things, it is all a matter of timing. You want to get them on the upswing when they are still sexually preoccupied but before they get all grandiose.
--
"Even I realized that money was to politicians what the ecalyptus tree is to
koala bears: food, water, shelter and something to crap on."
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 02/23/2011 08:48 PM, Kurt Ullman wrote:

the word "unmedicated" is superfluous.
nate
(sadly, BTDT.)
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

But what happens with the pellets? If you put it in the second dispenser, all you have for the first cycle is hot water.
If you put it in the first dispenser, for the second cycle, just hot water.
The boxes say to put the pellet in the "main dishwashing detergent dispenser" but they don't say which one that is.

Okay.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The first non-detergent cycle is intended to wash off any of the larger food particles and rinse off anything that will rinse off without detergent. The second (or third) cycle is when the lid pops open and releases the detergent. You can put detergent in the open cup if you have a particularly dirty load, Using only the open cup for detergent is not optimal.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.