Trying to install a GFCI outlet where I have 4 wires total

I'm starting to install GFCI outlets in this house I just bought. I'm starting with the circuit where the fridge would be. From what I can tell right now, the fridge is on its own circuit, but I haven't verified every single outlet; just ones on the same part of wall on both sides of the wall. The problem is that I have 4 wires total, one green (ground), one red, and two white wires.
I'm not sure at all how to wire this up. The old outlet had green to ground, red on the top left, white #1 on the top right, and white #2 on the bottom right. How would I wire this for a GFCI outlet?
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Adam Preble wrote:

May I ask why you need a GFCI for your fridge? Tony
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Tony Hwang wrote:

The outlet that I think is intended to the fridge would go behind the fridge where I plan to have the fridge. There's another outlet nearby that's also a part of the kitchen; that could work just as well. Generally, I'm just trying to keep it safe and update the whole kitchen together. I just coincidentally started on this one first. I doubt this would be the last outlet I see wired this way. I don't see a mention in the online manual of how much current the fridge draws, and I'm aware I might have to get a higher amperage GFCI.
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Adam Preble wrote:

I don't think how many wires or colors you have in an outlet matters. Just parallel move it over to the new GFCI outlet if you want to. Typically bathroom, exterior outlets need to be GFCI. In addition, in my house I have some in the sunroom/greenhouse. Tony
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Tony Hwang wrote:

If I do a parallel move, that puts from the backside: red on the top left of "load" white #1 on the top right of "load" white #2 on the bottom right of "line" green on ground
I did try this to satisfy my curiosity. I couldn't reset the outlet and try anything; it was dead after turning on the breaker. I could have connected something poorly, of course.
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Adam Preble wrote:

Wondering if that particular outlet is that of split one. Common thing in ther kitchen. Top and bottom half are split and fed by different breaker if that's the case. Like two circuits in one outlet. If it is split one, looking from the side of outlet, the metal link connecting'two halves is knocked off(missing) Tony
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It is not a split outlet, he only has one "hot" wire connected to it. He's got it wired backwards

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Very odd number and color of wires in that box. Red usually comes with a 3 wire circuit, red black white ground is understood.
White is typically a neutral, but can be a hot wire. Your wiring description tells me that the red is the hot and their are two neutrals.
I certainly do not understand why you would put a refer motor on a gfci outlet.
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In a kitchen, by current code all counter outlets are required to be GFCI protected. Do not install a GFCI for the fridge. Whatever wires you find on the existing outlet: i.e. two whites, one red, and green, Connect green to ground, connect red to "line hot" which should be a brass screw, and splice both whites together with a third white wire,(a pigtail) which you connect to the "line neutral" You are going to have different sets of wires at each outlet, but follow this same procedure. If you find two black wires on an existing outlet, connect them to the new GFCI with a pigtail as well.

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I can't think of a legitimate reason for having the two white wires like that; and would try to figure it out before I did any rewiring.
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I can. There is probably a three wire cable and a two wire cable in the box. The two black wires are spliced together to pass that circuit on to the next outlet. The red stops at the outlet Adam is working on to feed that outlet. The original installer connected the two whites on the outlet to join them together as well as feed that outlet. A better method would be to have spliced the whites together and add a pigtail to feed the outlet as RBM suggested.
John Grabowski http://www.mrelectrician.tv
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Probably didn't see any reason to, since they aren't connected to the outlet.
You ever get that "0.411-inch pipe" under your double-wide fixed properly? Have you tried chewing gum and duct tape yet?
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The new GFI should be marked on the back to indicate where the "line in" goes.
You need to identify the source and it attaches there.

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Stop. Don't.
All it takes is one nuisance trip, and you have an entire refrigerator full of spoiled food.

Uh-oh.
Hire a pro. You're in over your head.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
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