Trying to drill through steel siding

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On Monday, September 29, 2014 5:23:32 AM UTC-7, Pat wrote:

Steel siding is available today. Not common on houses as it is a premium product and most people won't go for the cost over aluminum or plastic.
I used it on my rehab house in the early 80s as every house that had aluminum had dents after several years and the plastic ones faded badly.
As for drilling it? Easy with nothing but a standard HS steel bit and no pilot hole, lubricant, or slow speed. The stuff is _thin_. A center punch will help get it started but is not really needed.
Harry K
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| Steel was quite common even into the 70's. It was galvanized before | painting and required special cutters to properly pinch the cuts so it | wouldn't rust from the fresh edges. Around here (an old steel area) | it was sold as a high end alternative to that cheap aluminum stuff. If | you (or your dad or your uncle) worked at the steel mill, you bought | into that. |
Interesting. I've never seen such a thing. I'm in New England. I wonder if it might have been more of a dry area product, such as in the Southwest? Though I once lived in Tucson for a couple of years and I don't remember any metal siding there. I suppose it was too hot.
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On Mon, 29 Sep 2014 02:16:42 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@invalidated.com wrote:

What!! You wore out your punch? You did say 'hole" but I thought you were using a center punch to make a dimple. That should be enough. Just to keep the bit from wandering. They also have hammerless center punches (I forget what they are really called), that you just push them with your hand and they arm and fire and make a dimple. I thought it was some con game to relieve me of my dollar seventy five, but they really work, although maybe not in steell if it's hard and thick enough.

Sure. No doubt about that. Steel siding is, aiui, better than aluminum siding because, though expensive, it doesn't leave dents when you lean a ladder against it. That's vinyl-clad steel siding. Don't know about any other kind.

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snipped-for-privacy@invalidated.com wrote in

Been using your drill lately to remove screws, haven't you? I bet you forgot to switch it back to run clockwise...
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On Monday, September 29, 2014 6:31:32 PM UTC-7, Doug Miller wrote:


That was my thought considering all the things he tried. It is a simple job to drill through steel siding.
Harry K
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Self-tapping/drilling sheet metal screws, most likely. I didn't believe it, either, when I first saw them, years ago. My buddy had the equipment, including a special slipper clutch head for his drill motor, which prevented the screw from stripping its own threads once it had bottomed out and tightened to the right torque. I was so astonished, I tried his screws and driver to run a single screw into a BSA motorcycle frame I was scrapping. Damned if that sucker didn't go right into the soft steel of that frame like a stick into soft butter. Frame members musta been at least 5/32"-3/16" thick. Blew my mind!

You should really be disgusted with yourself for not calling the guy and asking him what he was using. Heck, you hired him! Or go to any hardware store and simply ask. They sell that stuff all day long and it's obvious the technology has far surpassed what I experienced at least 3 decades ago. ;)
nb
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