trying to change bathroom sink faucet, can't get the old one off

It was a pain in the rear getting the nuts off the stems from underneath, had to get a deep socket from the auto parts store, but now everything is disconnected.
But the faucet assembly won't budge. I've pulled from above and hammered from below. What do I try next?
It looks like the new faucet assembly will go in easily once the old is off, but I can't seem to get there.
Help!
thanks,
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Best way is to remove the sink.
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Due to our crap water I have done that twice. First time on a stainless sink. Removed sink to grind it off at the bottom. Second time on a sink that was part of the counter top. On that one tore the faucet apart piece by piece with cutters, chisels and what ever worked. Have fun. WW
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wrote:

How much did you pay for the socket? That's nice if you have the right socket, but a 5 buck basin wrench usually works for me. Sounds like you either missed the faucet nut, or somebody bedded it with epoxy or liquid nails. Once the nuts are off, it should come loose easy.
--Vic
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$9.00 at the auto parts store.

Basin wrenches are great if the nut isn't too tight. No way a basin wrench could have touched these. It took huge force from the half inch drive socket wrench. And it was hard most of the way down the threads. Either there was a lot of goop or corrosion on them.

I've done this before and it just popped off. This one isn't budging, and I hammered pretty hard from below. I'm skeptical plumber's putty will hold this well, wonder what they used.
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At that point you just cut them off -- you don't even try to unfasten them...
~~ Evan
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+1...
Pays to know which tool you need to look for if you don't know how to do a job because you've never done it before...
~~ Evan
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wrote:

They are supposed to use plumbers putty but some guys use silicone. Try a putty knife under the faucet to get it started
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On Sep 19, 7:19pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

This job just got more frustrating. I realized after I took the nuts off, the washers remained stuck to the sink. I was able to pry them off with much difficulty.
The gap between stem and edge of the hole is completely filled with dark brown rock hard stuff. I can't even chip it. It's like they grouted it in. If it is some breed of plumber's putty they used enough to completely bed not only the faucet but the stems all the way through the underside. That explains why the nuts were stuck so securely.
I am starting to seriously doubt this CAN be removed.
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This job just got more frustrating. I realized after I took the nuts off, the washers remained stuck to the sink. I was able to pry them off with much difficulty.
The gap between stem and edge of the hole is completely filled with dark brown rock hard stuff. I can't even chip it. It's like they grouted it in. If it is some breed of plumber's putty they used enough to completely bed not only the faucet but the stems all the way through the underside. That explains why the nuts were stuck so securely.
I am starting to seriously doubt this CAN be removed.
Could you try heat with a propane torch (with care) to heat the faucet? WW
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On Sep 20, 3:59am, "Stormin Mormon"

I put a heat gun on it this morning. And heated a putty knife at the same time and tried to pry under it. No luck at all.
If the sink is bedded in the same stuff I'm not sure it is coming out, either. It doesn't even rock slightly in the hole.
Thinking out loud, I could drill a couple big holes in the decorative piece and fill with solvent, if there's anything that will soften putty (which seems a bit unlikely). I don't have a sawzall or grinder.
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wrote:

Tape around it to protect the porcelain. Protect backsplash Then you got lots of options. Hacksaw, sawzall, hammer and chisel. Then a grinder to finish. New faucet with base big enough to cover any damage. Sounds like fun. Really. I never got to do that.
--Vic
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On Tue, 20 Sep 2011 01:02:29 -0500, Vic Smith

Two thoughts: Try a piece of pipe slid over one of the bottom spuds as a lever to twist and raise one side of faucet. May be able to drill 5/8 or so hole in top decorative trim from the side and slip a tapered punch in as a lever against sink.
Some of the old putty can be incredibly hard.
--
Mr.E

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On 9/19/2011 4:18 PM, TimR wrote:

Good excuse to change the vanity or call a plumber. Life is too short to work under sinks.
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I made some progress.
I took the sink out into the backyard where the light is better. (same place I look for my car keys)
A heat gun, some WD40, and a hammer, and the old faucet and drain came out.
Easy to put the new stuff on when you're not under the sink.
Now to put it back - ooops. Not so easy. There are little clips that hold the sink to the metal ring, and they just don't want to go back where they came from.
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Job is done. Thanks for the advice and helping me think it through.
And yes, tools are cleaned and put away, trash is in the bin, water back on and no leaks.
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On 9/20/2011 1:31 PM, TimR wrote:

<snip>
Don't thank me. I'd have called a plumber. :)
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wrote:

As Colonel Hannibal Smith always said when the battle was done, "I love it when a plan comes together!"
--Vic
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