Truss support


I have a pole barn with pre-built trusses on 2 foot centers. I would like to put a loft at one end to increase my storage. Is it possible to reinforce the rafter so that I could remove parts of the truss to make it possible to move around easier when in the loft?
Thanks Mike
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Sure.
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wrote:

...what does the truss engineer say?
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Absolutely Oren!
My answer of "sure" included that. It was as vague and had as many implied items as the question.
With enough money, a structural engineer, concrete, lumber, steel, qualified construction people, etc., etc, my reply is 100% accurate - "Sure".
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That can only be answered by the company that built the truss or a structural engineer. My answer would be NO.
The truss serves as a complete unit. Reinforcing part of it does not support the other parts.
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Colbyt
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You could pull off the metal and remove some trusses. Then have the truss company make you some designed for storage.

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Search the group for previous discussions on modifying roof or ceiling truss to accept additional load.
Of course what you want to do is possible but the devil is in the details. But unless you are an experienced truss designer or builder ....you'll need a professional to design the changes.
I am an engineer with lots of design and construction experiences BUT I still had a roofing engineer examine the roof of my house for the suitability & retrofit need to switch from wooden shingles to concrete tile. He did quick, right and for a reasonable fee.
For the "one-off job", it makes little sense to attempt to DIY on a task the requires specialized experience or education.
cheers Bob
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Like many have said, it all depends ...............on many factors. In Ohio, a typical pole barn with a metal roof has trusses 4' on center with 2x4 purlings laying flat. I just built a pole barn and I have metal sissor trusses 16' on center with 2x6's standing on their sides. They are an engineered truss that are designed to carry the load and withstand the wind forces here in Ohio. Your part of the country may require a totally different approach.
I am sure what you are asking can be done, but is it worth the expense, labor and risk? Only you can decide after researching. As good as this NG is, it isn't the place to rely on its information on how to do it because of the regional variables.
Hank
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I did that in an attic space. The solution I employeed was to reinforce every alternate truss and leave the ones between alone. That made enough space to move around without having to completely rely on my "off the cuff" reinforcement strategy.
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