True 1" thick 1 x 12's?

So, I have brackets for shelves, and I want to get wood stock (oak, poplar, pine, whatever it is as long as I can stain it to match the wood in the room) for the shelves.
I have been having a problem finding wood that is truly 1" thick. As you know, 1 x 12's are actually 3/4" thick. Does anyone know of a supplier that I might be able to get 1x12s that are actually 1" thick?
Or, if not, anyone have any other ideas?
Thanks,
Ryan
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The Chairman wrote:

Ask for "five quarters" (5/4 x 12). Any lumberyard and almost all home centers will carry it. If you're looking for clear wood, it won't be cheap. In similar situations I'll double up on some 3/4" plywood and glue a solid piece of wood on the front edge.
R
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Thanks, I'll try that. Forgive my ignorance, but is plywood also subject to this same phenomena? IE: is 3/4" actually 1/2"? Because you said you'd double up on 3/4 ply? Wouldn't that be 1.5"?
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The reason that a two-by-four, for example, is actually 1.5" x 3.5" is that it's rough-sawn at the mill to 2" x 4". Then it shrinks some as it dries. Finally, it's planed smooth, which reduces it to the finished size of 1.5" x 3.5".
This obviously isn't the case with plywood.
However... some years back, a bean counter working for one of the plywood manufacturers figured out that they could get about three percent more plywood sheets from the same amount of raw material by reducing the thickness slightly. Nominal 3/4" plywood is usually 23/32" thick. Nominal 1/2" plywood is usually 15/32". And you can't depend on nominal 1/4" plywood being anywhere even close to 1/4" -- I've seen some that's _less_than_ 3/16" being sold as "quarter-inch".
Having said that, if you sandwich two pieces of nominal 3/4" plywood together, the result will be close to 1.5", but not exactly, more like 1 7/16".
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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The Chairman wrote:

Why do you need 1" thick? Most shelves are made of 3/4" thick material. 1" soft wood is actually 3/4" and surfaced 4/4 hardwood is 13/16" thick. 3/4" plywood is 3/4" thick. If you keep supports to 30" intervals or less, any of the above will be fine and not sag. If you really need 1" thick material buy 5/4 hardwood.
BTW, a 1 x12 won't be 12" wide either!
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Yeah, good question. The brackets that the wife bought slip over the end of the shelves, kind of like a towel bar or something like that. Good point about the 12s not really being 12... shoot. Maybe I need to just buy the 1" plywood, and veneer the front with a strip of real wood.
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Even 1" plywood is going to be hard to find. As for a full 1 x 12", if you can find them, it is going to cost $4 or more per linear foot. Very few boards are that width. I'd look at using different brackets. 3/4" is much more common and easier to find in the species you want.
In a bookshelf, the front edge is usually the only part visible so trimming plywood is a better way.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/



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Dang. That's what it is looking like. Ikea has some crappy veneer particle board shelves designed for these brackets, but I wanted to avoid them. I'll look for something similar online, maybe I can replace the ones that I have.
I did find 1" plywood near me... I'll have to check it out and choose.
Thanks,
Ryan
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Where do you live... Honestly I have NEVER seen 1 inch thick Plywood I will admit that I never looked since I do not use sheetgoods all that much .. LOL
Bob Griffiths .
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But I have seen plenty of 1 1/8 plywood its the commen size of concrete forms
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The Chairman wrote:

Get 2"x12". Plane the plank down to whatever thickness you need.
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber%8
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HeyBub wrote:

Yep. Use it once and sell it on eBay.
Hey why stop there? Plenty of wood out there, buy one of these and go get it. http://www.equipfind.com/logging/2000Llinkbelt2800Quantum-Delimber.htm
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Sorry to reply to my own post, but I forgot that I have to rip the material to 11" anyway to fit in the brackets! That's why... :)
Ryan
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The Chairman wrote:

Cheaper to laminate 2 pieces of 1/2" ply.
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If you have a planer, just buy regular 2x12's (1.5" x 11.25") and plane them down to whatever thickness you need. If you really need 12" depth, you could edge glue a 2x6 and 2x8 together, rip to 12" width, then plane to thickness. Easy to do, but takes some time, clamps, and an assortment of power tools. I recently did this myself to build a shelf out of recycled 2x6 redwood deck boards.
As long as you use kiln-dried lumber, even construction grade boards can be made to look fairly nice. Apply some MinWax "wood preconditioner" (helps stain go on evenly), stain whatever color you wish, and apply the finish.

The other posters recommendation of using plywood could also work nicely. However, rather than trying to find 1" plywood, I would use two sheets of 1/2" plywood glued back to back. Plywood generally has a "good" side and a "bad" side. Using two sheets would let the good faces show on both sides. 1/2" ply is also easier to find that 1" ply. Then band the edges with a strip of solid wood. Poplar is popular... :)
Because 1/2" ply is not exactly 1/2" thick, your shelves will be slightly less than 1" thick, but probably close enough for the application?
Anthony
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And if you have longer spans, consider using 1/4" sandwiched around 1/2" thick strips. The resulting board will be stronger and lighter according to everything I've read on the matter. (read up about "stressed/streched skin platforms")
--
be safe.
flip
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Find a hardwood lumber yard. The kind that sells to wood workers. Get some 5/4 rough stock, and have it thickness planed down to what ever thickness you need.
You don't give a location where you is. In the Chicago area http://www.owlhardwood.com/ is the place to go.
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sure would be much easier just go give up on this purist idea that you need 1" thick shelves...
if you want them to LOOK like they are 1" thick, put a rim around it.
randy

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xrongor wrote:

There does seem to be a bit of overkill in this thread. But you can't say the OP didn't get some options! :o)
What a great group.
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