Troubleshooting well pump ( with pics)

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I suspect he does also and either it or the screen around it (if it has one) is partly clogged. If he has a self-primng pump, it would work on his system without a footvalve. Sounds like the maximum draw distance would only be about 20', well within self-priming range.
Harry K
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You talk as if a foot valve is not a check valve?
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On Apr 25, 12:48 pm, snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

A foot valve is a check valve, yes. But what the others asre talking about are clearly _not_ footvalves. If they meant a footvalve they would use the proper term.
I see this all the time here, the instant a pump problem is mentioned the swarm of "check valve" shows up - a clear indication that the posters are probably not knowledgable about pump systems.
Harry K
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When the specs say the limit is "25 feet of head", does that mean the actual depth of the water level in the pipe cannot be more than 25 feet below the pump? Reason I ask is my water level is 2 feet below the basement floor, but the actual well casing is at least more than 30 feet down. I stuck an electrical snake down the casing, and it reached 30 feet until the end of the snake, so its probably even deeper.
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I think I am going to rig up some kind of test. Fill a 5 gal bucket with water, stick a suction pipe in the bucket, and see if this pump works. If it does, then I know it must be the well.
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wrote:

No, the "head" is how far it will pump vertically, above the pump. That doesn't mean that your pump can't lift water from 25 feet down (though that would be about the limit for any pump). "Shallow well" or "jet" pumps are designed to lift water from wells lower than the pump. "Deep well" pumps are put down in the well and can lift higher.

The level of the well casing doesn't matter, only the level of the water. Of course the level will go down when the pump is operating and further in dry times.
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Yes, measured from pump to the top of the water. Matter of physics, water can be sucked up a pipe only by air pressure pushign down on it. Theoretically atmospheric air pressure at around 14 psi would allow 'sucking' up to 34 ft but restrictions to flow, etc cut that down to the accepted figure of 25-26 ft.
Even at 2ft, without a check valve your pump must be self priming.
After thinking over the problem I can ony think of 3 items that may be the problem.
1. Malfunctioning foot valve 2. Pump worn out - probably not as it appears it pumps out the prime just fine. 3. Well not producing enought water to maintain flow - probably not in your case. If the well has 20 ft of water in the cased portion it would take more than a very short period to pump it 'dry'.
Looks like footvalve to me.
Question: What is the 'cased size' of the well? Wide enough to put a new suction ipe in alongside the one already there? If so, that is what I would do if it is physically possible.
Harry K Harry K
Harry K
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CORRECTION, CORRECTION CORRECTION:
I misread the question. The "yes" below skews my answer and it would have been clear without that word.

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On Apr 25, 12:51 pm, snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

And the point is that adding another, useless, unneccessary one at the top causes _more_ restriction. One is all that is needed in the system and one in workign order is absolutely necessary. Of course if the pump is self-priming and within about 26 ft fromt he static water level the footvalve can be eliminated.
There is an exception. In the case of a submerged pump (they contain a checkvalve internally) where that valve is leaking back, one can 'shadetree' a fix by inserting a checkvalve up top prior to the pressure tank. Keeps the sytem from draining back when the pump shuts down.
The reason that doesn't work on suction pumps is that the intake pipe must be kept full of water to maintain prime. Unless, of course, the pump is self priming and is no more that about 26ft above the static water level.
Harry K
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On Apr 23, 10:00 pm, snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

Minor correction. He needs a "foot valve" (if he doesn't already have one) - it goes on the bottom of the suction pipe.
Harry K
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