Troubleshooting Alternator / Voltage Reg

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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I know of more than one working mechanic who has paid someone else to repair their vehicle. I've done it, mainly because I just didn't want to work on my own vehicle after spinning wrenches all day. That and having the "spare time" to do the work never seemed to appear.
--
Steve W.

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On Sun, 2 Oct 2016 10:29:42 -0700, "Snuffy \"Hub Cap\" McKinney"

from the alternator on the vehicle than removing the alternator. Can't remember how it is on a 4 liter - but it is certainly no easier than on the 3.0
The "internal" regulator is bolted to the alternator. It IS available separatgely for repair - and SOME replacement alternators come without the regulator. Standard practice around here is to supply the alternator complete with regulator installed and tested.
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On Sun, 2 Oct 2016 10:02:09 -0700, "Snuffy \"Hub Cap\" McKinney"

external or sepparate regulator - certainly not one built by Ford - perhaps a twin engined Piper?? ALL Ford aerostars of that vintage use a regulator that is attached to and part of the alternator. Yes, you can change it without dissassembling the alternator - and if it is a 3 liter you CAN change it without removing the alternator but it takes about half the time to remove the alternator than it does to finesse the regulator off and back on in place.. The chances of the regulator fixing it are significantly less than 50/50, in my experience.. Remove the alternator and replacxe it, complete with new regulator. Just do the job ONCE for a change.
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is fine.

Alternator is a pain to remove.

3.0
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I want to point this out as it may save lots of people big bucks AND inconvenience over time.
I am a field service tech and drive a lot.
I used to have alternators fail a lot, perhaps every 2 or 3 3 years... before i went to a preventive maintence program for my vehicles battery
by 3 years old i juust replace the vehicles battery, wether it tests good or not......
i hate getting stranded with a dead battery
since i went to this my alternators quit failing. only failure was once with bearing failure
my theory, batteries at end of life make the alternator work much harder.
so a new battery every few years, before it fails saves on alternators.
i give my still good just replaced batteries to my best buddy who uses them on a 14 foot blade windmill he built.
his dud batteries get traded in, at the time of batttery replacement so no core charge......
batteries are easier to change than alternators
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Mon, 03 Oct 2016 12:35:35 GMT in alt.home.repair, wrote:

It's not a theory. You're correct. It happens because a dying battery becomes a black hole for any electrical source connected to it. It does increase the strain on the voltage regulator components as a result, which most of the time, are where the failure itself occurs. It's not that often that a winding inside the alternator goes before the regulator does.
Btw, if you've seen the commercials for the tiny lithium (pick a flavor) jump start units for sale, if your battery is nearly completely drained and/or is actually bad, that unit isn't going to be able to start your car right away/if ever. As, it's power is being consumed by the battery first and foremost. The dead battery will have to reach a certain charge point before enough current is available to do anything else. That's why you have to wait a few minutes sometimes when you connect the old fashioned jumper cables to it.
I tried to explain this to an associate a few weeks ago when she was showing it to me. She ignored my advice and learned for herself that depending on battery condition, it will not work. She learned the hard way, btw. She wound up late for several places she had to be not a week later. Left her lights on by accident, battery wasn't totally dead, but was down enough to the point, it was going to take whatever power you fed it and not leave enough amps for the starter solenoid let alone starter itself to crank until it's own capacity was restored some.
You'll notice on the tv commercials when they demo it, the car solenoid clicks. In that scenario, the battery is weak, but has a little juice available; it won't consume everything the little battery pack has, some will pass onto the cars other systems when you try to start it.
If the battery is way down or outright dead, it's going to consume whatever the little battery can provide it and leave little to nothing for something attached that wants to drain a pile of amps at once. Dead batteries/bad batteries/damaged batteries are black holes for incoming power.
Or, they remove! the car battery and tie it directly to the battery cables (which allows everything the little pack can muster to try to start your car) And finally, they'll show you a digital meter that's measuring voltage and only that showing that 12volts is available. Sure is, but, not enough amps are behind it to start your car. And there won't be until the little battery dumps enough power back into the car battery so it'll stop sucking power down like a black hole; refusing to pass on enough to benefit your cars starter.
It's the same concept as jump starting your car. If your car battery is too far down, your car isn't going to crank right over, even if the engine on the other car is running and you you know for sure the other cars battery is hot to trot. The dead battery will accept as much as it possibly can get from the power source and leave next to nothing for anything trying to pull from it until it reaches a certain charge point. Until it does, you're pissing in the wind.
OTH, if you take one battery terminal lose on the dead car and connect your jumper wires and/or jump start battery pack directly to the terminals on the car you want to start, that car will get the full benefits of your borrowed power source and turn over for you.
Once it does, reconnect the disconnected terminal and let your alternator finish recharging it. Make sure you leave enough room to re-attach it while your external power source is connected, so that the circuit remains completed; as some cars will die if you disconnect the battery; even if the alternator is perfectly okay and is supplying 'run' power. Those cars are using the battery to complete a circuit and if the circuit goes open, your car doesn't continue running.
Obviously when you reconnect the terminals, go ahead and remove your external power source asap; you don't want to stress your alternator by asking it to charge two batteries at once. Don't worry about surging your cars computer, either. The weak battery will happily accept it without passing it along; the black hole effect does have that benefit, atleast.
--
People you encounter every day are fighting battles you know nothing
about. Be kind.
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