trouble with recent emergency battery, inverter, car set up

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On 07/01/2015 07:26 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

That might work. You'd have to be sure it didn't get too hot and trigger the relief valve in the tank.
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On 7/1/2015 12:12 PM, Mark Lloyd wrote:

Would take some experimenting, to find the right distance, wind flow, etc. Still, a good use of otherwise wasted heat.
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On Wed, 01 Jul 2015 08:26:31 -0400, Stormin Mormon

particularly when using rubber hoses from the tank.
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On 7/1/2015 3:34 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Might be possible to put a thermometer on the tank, and regulate how much heat is applied. That way, you won't over pressurize the rubber hoses you mention.
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On Wed, 01 Jul 2015 16:43:23 -0400, Stormin Mormon

"babysit" the generator either.
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On 7/1/2015 11:03 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

OK, don't do that, then. Go back to freezing tanks like you always do.
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On Thu, 02 Jul 2015 08:57:42 -0400, Stormin Mormon

as my primary backup fuel. So i don't know where you get "Go back to freezing tanks like you always do."
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On 07/01/2015 03:43 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I suppose you could do something like that. It may cost more than having 2 tanks, which could run your generator for longer.
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On 07/01/2015 02:34 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:
[snip]

Are you concerned about melting the hose?
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wrote:

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On 06/30/2015 09:52 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:
[snip]

Maybe you could convert the genny to run on propane. There are some conversions that let you use either fuel. You can keep propane longer.

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On 6/30/2015 10:23 PM, Mark Lloyd wrote:

Reply center posted, as your reply was.
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On 06/30/2015 08:48 AM, trader_4 wrote:
[snip]

I considered running my washer on a generator during the power outage a month ago, but knew there was no way to run the electric dryer.

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On 6/30/2015 10:20 PM, Mark Lloyd wrote:

Some generators do have 220 VAC outlet, but it would have taken some creative wiring to get to the dryer. That would have been a real waster of gasoline. Filament heaters suck major electric amps, and watts.
Wiring the furnace was excellent idea. I have done that during power cuts. If the gas or fuel source is okay, furnace provides good heat, and warms the home evenly. Not just spot heat in one room.
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On 07/01/2015 07:14 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

[snip]

Some people here say it's wrong to have a cord & plug on a furnace, but they never say why. When I bought this house in 1998, it had cord & plug on the furnace. When I got a new furnace a couple of years ago, that was installed the same way. It could be very useful during a power failure in the winter (ice storm?).
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On Wednesday, July 1, 2015 at 12:10:12 PM UTC-4, Mark Lloyd wrote:

It's a violation of NEC. Eqpt is to be permanently wired, with exceptions for eqpt that needs to be cord&plug to facilitate maintenance. That kind of equipment typically comes listed with it's own cord and plug.
When I bought this house in 1998, it had cord & plug

It's allowed in some places. And it's certainly not the worst NEC violation and could be fine if it's done right. But I don't see the point really. With a panel lockout kit and an inlet, you can hook your generator up to the whole house and power anything you want, not just the furnace.
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On 07/01/2015 11:46 AM, trader_4 wrote:

I know it's a violation of the NEC. What I'd really like to know is what (if anything) is actually wrong with doing it. NEC is supposed to be about preventing fires. How is having a plug-in furnace a fire hazard?
Could it have something to do with grounding?
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On Thursday, July 2, 2015 at 12:35:13 PM UTC-4, Mark Lloyd wrote:

I doubt it has anything to do with grounding. I think it has everything to do with plug and cord connected appliances, eqpt being a more common source of fires, compared to permanently wired ones. The code isn't specifically addressing furnaces, it's permanently installed eqpt in general. When you have things connected on cords, people tend to start using extension cords, draping them anywhere. And IDK how far back that code goes, but older furnace stacks, steam boilers, etc could have temps where if a cord comes in contact, it could melt the insulation. As I said, if it's done right, it should not be a problem and some places allow it.
From a practical standpoint, it's irrelevant to me. Rather than rewire the furnace to cord and plug, I'd always opt for an interlock on the panel and an inlet, so you can power anything in the house.
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On 7/1/2015 12:10 PM, Mark Lloyd wrote:

For some reason the NEC says the furnace should be hard wired. No idea why, a plug and socket make so much more sense. Works for refrigerators, washers, dryers, window AC. Why not furnace?
Anyone know?
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On Wednesday, July 1, 2015 at 4:05:30 PM UTC-4, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Because those other items are portable, not permanently attached] to the structure and they came with UL listed cords and plugs. Ever see a furnace come with one? And the install instructions typically say that it's to be installed consistent with NEC, etc.
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