Trim work question


I have what is probably the dumbest question on the planet, but believe it or not, I cannot find an answer to it - maybe because it is so dumb.
I am totally renovating a bathroom and tiling all of the walls. So I have totally gutted it, redone the plumbing, lighting, etc and have put up drywall.
Now the window frame is level with the drywall, but I am tiling the walls.
So - to put on the trim, do I trim it all first (windows and baseboard) and then tile up to it, or do I tile first and then somehow have to shim all of the doors, windows and baseboards to put the trim over top?
See - I did mention it was a dumb question - and yes - I am serious... <embarassing>
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Its not a dumb question but drywall doesnt last behind tile in bath- shower areas, do concrete board since its open and use thinset not glue.
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Trim first, then tile, of course -- why would you even consider doing it the other way?
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:
-snip-

Cause it is his house and he can do it any way he wants? And maybe there is some advantage to doing it one way or the other?
Usually trim goes on last to hide any 'rough edges'. But grout can hide a few rough edges, too. If tiling first would make shimming out the window before trimming necessary, I think you could make a case for trimming first.
Jim
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote: ...

...
Well, you can do either, but...
If the trim is not significantly thicker profile than the tile when set, then it will end up almost flush with the surface of the tile and that generally does not look very good.
What typically is done around windows to adjust for wall thickness is to add a frame to increase the depth. That's what I would recommend.
As another poster noted, hopefully you used at least greenboard on all walls and concreteboard or like in actual wet areas not just plain ol' drywall.
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I actually just used greenboard....
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Greenboard wont last, it lasts longer than drywall but concrete board and thinset will stay 10x longer. How long it lasts depends if the house shifts seasonaly or eventualy, cracks open and water does its thing, with a window is usualy where mine failed, below the window. Trim after and the job will look cleaner but be harder to attach, but I would loose the drywall before you cant.
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I guess I'll consider redoing the shower part of it with concrete board as you suggest. I did my other bath years ago with regular stuff and tile and after almost 18 years it is still tight and dry.... no issues whatsoever. I figure all of this stuff will outlast me, so it is all relative anyway...
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It would be best to turn back backer board and tile to the window. I would avoid wood trim at the window completely. Door trim, etc should go on first. Tile to the trim, caulk NOT grout between tile and trim.
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I assume you mean your window sill and wall are "flush".

If you're using tile base, it goes first.
All other cuts are fit after.

It's not a dumb question, but it suggests you ought to plan extensively, including the size/s of your tile.
Tile (/grout) looks easy on paper... or if you look at what passes for a "professional" tile job these days. The inexperienced amateur seems most likely to turn out their best work with careful planning.
For example, on a wall with a window (assuming the window opening will also be tiled) you have to factor how the end cap tiles of the wall/ window opening will break with the field, and if you can make minor adjustments to the field to break whole tiles at the cap.
One thing you don't want is 1" cuts up both sides of a window. -----
- gpsman
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Since I am not totally sure if you mean wood trim or tile tirm, I'll add this thought...... If the window is in a position to get direct water contact, why not trim with tile edging or the tile itself rather than wood? Or, is that what you are doing?
As far as using concrete board vs greeen board vs drywall. ASk yourself these questions.............How long are you gonna live? How long are you gonna stay in the house? How long until you want to re- model again.
Hank
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

I can't imagine tiling first and then putting up the trim. I would prime all of the trim before putting it up, including end cuts. You can test how the depth of the tiling looks alongside the trim by putting some cardboard behind a tile and laying it flat alongside the trim. If the depth of the trim vs. depth of tile isn't appealing, you could glue up trim with thin wood strip on the back, being meticulous in gluing and clamping...again, sand and prime before putting it up.
No DRYWALL in wet areas, as others have said. Caulk, not grout, where tile meets different sufaces and at corners.
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On Sat, 20 Feb 2010 06:20:38 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com"

Probably doesn't matter. I would trim last to cover any rough edges. It is much easier working with trim than tile. Which way would produce a better, cleaner looking job?
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