Trim 15 year-old shingles

Page 1 of 2  
All right. Now for the ugly stuff.
About 15 years ago, in a weak moment, I hired some loose roofers to scrape and shingle my 2-car detached garage in th US midwest. I served 'em lunch and paid cash. They failed to trim the shingles and stole my hammer.
Now the shingles overhang up-to-90% of the open gutter. Can't even get my hands in there to clean out the gutter sediment, etc.
How might I trim the shingles? I tried tin-snips and a reciprocating saw, neither were practical. The shingles look solid but are somewhat stiff. I doubt a hawk-bill knife would work.
Any ideas?
TIA, Willie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Snap a chalk line and have at it with a circular saw. Go slowly and don't use a blade with too many teeth.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In the absence of a hawk-bill, the circular saw would do it. Set the depth to slightly less than the piece of plywood underneath, protecting the drip-edge.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What plywood and what drip edge? The roof shingles should overhang the drip edge by an absolute minimum of 1/2", 3/4" preferred. I understand the concern about not cutting into anything else but shingles, but plywood (sheathing) and drip edge are not in harm's way. If you're talking about using a piece of plywood underneath the shingles to protect something, there's nothing to protect - they're supposed to be hanging in free air. Unless the shingles are resting on the gutter nails/screws, or the gutters are hung by straps, the circular saw can cut through both layers of shingles in one pass, except right into a valley. The valley will require some hand cutting with a hook blade utility knife. A hawkbill knife is not nearly as good as a hook blade utility knife for cutting in place roof shingles. A hawkbill is fine for scoring a shingle while it's loose.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/22/2011 3:06 PM Willie The Wimp spake thus:

I was going to suggest the roofer's knife until I read that last sentence.
How about buying a few boxes of utility knife blades and using that? Pain in the ass and will dull the blades in no time flat, but should work.
--
The current state of literacy in our advanced civilization:

yo
wassup
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/22/2011 7:06 PM, Willie The Wimp wrote:

They use a roofing blade for a utility knife. It has a hook on it and you pull, not press. Widely available. For us, the circular saw sounds like a better idea.
Jeff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/22/2011 5:01 PM Jeff Thies spake thus:

I thought that's what he meant by "hawk-bill knife". Not familiar with that term, though. Izzat what roofers call that little blade on the back of their roofing hatchets?
By the way, I've got one of those, and used it the last time I did a roofing job (very small one). Love those pull-cut blades.
--
The current state of literacy in our advanced civilization:

yo
wassup
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I vote the circular saw option, with an old, no-good blade, if you have one. If your circular saw is not cheap and you hate to use it for that job, go to the pawn shop and get a cheapie.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 22 Mar 2011 18:05:42 -0800, David Nebenzahl wrote:

I would say a hawk-bill knife is a laminate or carpet blade. I am guessing this is a standard asphalt shingle. A hook blade cutting from underneath would be my suggestion. Why the overhang? The shingles should only be to the edge of the drip edge. Or did they forget to install that too?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I think they used to call 'em linoleum knives.

Correct.
No room. I'd tear my hands to shreds.

Drip edge was in place.
Was in the OP:

They ripped me off. Avoid 'em if ya can, but if ya gotta deal with loose roofers, watch 'em like a hawk.
I guess it's the circ. saw. Gonna be a bitch ...
Thanks to all.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 22 Mar 2011 22:33:43 -0600, Willie The Wimp wrote:

Try a composite blade for steel. The lack of teeth should help avoid ripping the shingles to shreads.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Don't dread things that don't require it. It's really not a big deal. The main issue is safety, so ladders with ladder jacks and planks, or something similar, is the way to go. The saw blade will only be exposed for roughly a 3/4" depth of cut, which minimizes a lot of the more grievous danger. Just go at a comfortable rate and let the saw do the work. Don't try to push it to make it go faster. That's how injuries and damage occur.

Have you ever used one of those blades to cut roof shingles with a circular saw? I'm guessing you haven't. Without teeth, same as with too many teeth, the shingles melt and bind the blade. The teeth don't rip shingles - moving the saw too quickly rips shingles. The OP will be trying to follow a chalk line from an awkward position - he certainly won't be moving the saw quickly.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

One old junk ladder is all I got.

I'll keep it in mind.
I drug a circ. saw up there today just to size it up. If I can fashion a guide to keep the blade a uniform distance from the edge of the gutter, it might work.
There's maybe 8 gutter mount struts holding the gutter up. Have to remove or stop, lift saw, restart 8 times.

I popped a fine-tooth 'cip saw blade in and tested. Jammed the teeth with asphalt muy pronto.
Would you attempt to do the deed on a hot, sunny day with shingles softened, or on a normal/chilly day?
Thanks, Willie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Whatta larf. An old shingle talking like he can get 15 yr-old trim.
nb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

You don't want cold/freezing as the shingles are more likely to crack while you're mucking about with them, and you don't want hot/direct sun as the shingles might get scuffed up more with the circular saw base running over them - plus it's no fun working on a roof when the sweat is running into your eyes. So mid-range temps - 50s, 60s, 70s.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 23 Mar 2011 22:49:38 -0600, Willie The Wimp

Keep you hips between the rails. You're looking at doing no more than a yard before moving your ladder.

Snap a chalk line on it. It's worth buying one if you don't have one.

If you're cutting an inch or less off the roof edge and set you blade just deep enough, you shouldn't hit any hangers.

Rough blade should work better, but you need to start moving in slowly with full rpm. I haven't done this, but I'd try my jigsaw with a rough blade first. Lighter and easier to control. Cheaper blades too. You'd have to use a knife at the hangers. Nobody will notice. If somebody says anything tell them to stay off your roof.

You want just right. Not too hot, not too cold. Just right.
--Vic

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
This is not a job anyone does on a regular basis, so most of the suggestions,so for, are a bit common sense and practical experience rationale. There is likely several approaches you will have to try, before you get one that works reasonably well. I don't think any approach will make this particular job easy and/or smooth sailing.
If all you have is an old ladder, that approach, to me, will make any cutting approach more tedious, difficult and likely not too safe, depending on your scenario. A scaffold rents for $10 a week, here. A scaffold will make any cutting approach, no matter which, much more convenient, easy and safe.... and the end result would almost certainly be more satisfying.
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Yeah, a yard sounds about right.
Structure is not very high, but it's on side of a hill, so roof line is level, ground is not. Luvit, Luvit, Luvit!

I got one, but it's a bitch to position it properly, snap it. I'll probably do both. Overhang is not uniform, might vary from 2" to 4" on the side I've been measuring.

Hangers mount in the *top* of gutters. Hitting one with circ. saw at full rpm would be hell-to-pay, I Gay-Ron-Tee.

Check.
I got a little piece in the workshop I can test on.

Check.
Many thanks to all.
Willie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/22/2011 10:05 PM, David Nebenzahl wrote:

I'm not either. What I meant was these:
http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1v/R-100023636/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId051&catalogId053
Which fit any utility knife. That is what the roofers I know use.
Jeff
Izzat what roofers call that little blade on the back

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 23 Mar 2011 06:00:09 -0400, Jeff Thies wrote:

http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1v/R-100023636/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId051&catalogId053
Learn to follow threads. I was not responding to your post, but David's.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.