Trilevel house siding deteriorating at roof junction

My next door neighbor has a trilevel house and the siding on the top level is deteriorating at the point where it meets the roof of the middle level. What is the correct construction practice for this situation to prevent the problem in the future? Is this a place where flashing is required (from the ground I can't tell if any flashing was used) or was the siding just extended to close to the shingles such that water flowing down the roof would just soak up into the siding?
John Keith snipped-for-privacy@juno.com
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You have to provide much more.
Post some pictures.
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Siding should be held off of the shingles by a few inches. It could also be splash from water falling off of an eave above as well. Flashing would be tucked behind the siding, and prevents water intrusion into the house itself.
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You can see the same sort of junction on any split level house and on loads of rows of townhouses, when built along a slope. Every two houses will be a little lower than the ones they are next to, leaving the same siding/roof junction.
Is trilevel the same as split level? Every split level I've ever seen has a two story part and a one story part next to it, at a middle level, so I suppose they could all be called trilevel.
If they are not the same, what is trilevel? If they are the same, why the different name? Is it like calling townhouses townhomes, when they are the same?

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wrote:

This house has the garage/LR/DR/Kitchen on the ground level (like a ranch) then there is a level half underground with the rec room accessed by a 6 or 7 step stairway and above this area are the BR and bathrooms also accessed by a 6 or step stariway. I've always heard this style referred to as trilevel, maybe this terminology is a function of geography.
I'll try to post a picture. But the more I think about it (without getting up on the roof) I believe the siding is probably in very close proximity to the roof sheathing and the water is just wicking up into the panels.
. John Keith snipped-for-privacy@juno.com
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OK. We call these split-levels in the midwest (regardless of what rooms are on what floors, but I think yours is the most common).
In NYC we don't discuss such things.
In Baltimore, they have them but I can't remember anyone ever calling them anything. I havent' read a real estate listing for a quarter century. I know someone who lives in one. Someday I'll ask her what she calls it.

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