Tree ID Forum?

Anyone know a good place to post questions about identifying trees? I know this is not the right one, but it's one of the few newsgroups where people actually hang out.
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It look a lot like this ficus but it doesn't fit all the specs.... http://www.desertmuseum.org/programs/alamos_trees_fictri.php
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rec.gardens plenty of posters.
--
Dan Espen

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wrote:

where people actually hang out.

Trees are in So Calif. Guessing the ages are from 2-10 years. Largest ones are 10-12 inch diameter at the base. No white sap here except me.
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We had a local Gerdening Center employee volunteer to come out and look around. He gave me common names and latin names for plants I only described over the telephone. What he could do in person must be awesome. Also, the right price, free.
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Forgot about that one, they have the 'dangly thingies' as seed pods.
The landscaper identified the bushes around here as 'brittle bushes' seems the gum is used to make gum [I'll bet it's that Yucatan flavored gum, which my grandmother liked, unbelievable, icch!], the Indians used to chew it and use it for gluing arrow heads onto the shafts. ...I can account for how sticky that stuff is, too! Seems the bushes have a natural poison that retards other plants growing around them, yep, it's bare around them.
Amazing all the uses the local fauna have for these bushes. The bush has a bright yellow flowering. Bees/wasps even hummingbirds go after the nectar, and some birds eat the flowers directly. Or, eat the seed pods after they bulge. After seeds drop, the birds flock around the bases pecking away. Bet the chipmunks get in there too. The rabbits chew on something under there and even the lizards use the bushes as cover from hawks and eagles. And of course the occasional rattlesnake likes to snooze in the shade under them. Can't believe how alive this 'desert' is.
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wrote:

where people actually hang out.

Trees are in So Calif. Guessing the ages are from 2-10 years. Largest ones are 10-12 inch diameter at the base. No white sap here except me.
== This one turned out to be Carrotwood.
Cupianopsis anacardioides Common Names: Carrot Wood, Tuckeroo, Beach Tamarind, Green-Leaved Tamarind Native To: Australia
http://selectree.calpoly.edu/treedetail.lasso?ridF6
Cupaniopsis anacardioides, with common names tuckeroo, carrotwood, beach tamarind and green-leaved tamarind, is a species of flowering tree in the soapberry family, Sapindaceae, that is native to eastern and northern Australia. The usual habitat is littoral rainforest on sand or near estuaries. The range of natural distribution is from Seven Mile Beach, New South Wales (34.8° S) to Queensland, northern Australia and New Guinea. C. anacardioides is an invasive species in some parts of the United States, primarily Florida and Hawaii. -- Wikipedia
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