Transporting 20 gallons of gas in your trunk and storing in your back yard in the open air question

Page 5 of 8  


Outdoor cans are subject to rusting. if they leak,they pollute the ground water. I doubt a copper/lead bullet piercing a gas can would ignite one. (anyone care to experiment for the group? 8-) )
Besides,hunters should not be shooting near residences. (yes,I said "should",and many don't do as they should)
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

<http://www.kotulas.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?catalogId 051&storeId001&productId120&langId=-1&cm_ven=CSE&cm_cat=Nextag&cm_plategory&cm_ite34216>
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 23 Jul 2010 09:34:04 -0500, Jim Yanik wrote:

http://mythbustersresults.com/episode15
If a bullet is shot through the fuel tank of a car, it will explode.
busted
The gas tank did not explode.
(This myth was revisited in episode 38 and it was found to be plausible if the tank is shot with a tracer round.)
http://mythbustersresults.com/episode38
REVISITED: A gas tank will explode when shot by a bullet. (From Episode 15)
busted
It has already been proven that when shot by a normal bullet a gasoline tank will not explode. However, if a gasoline tank is shot by a tracer round from a great enough distance so that the round can ignite with air friction, it will cause the gasoline to catch fire. By the time this happened the tank was so riddled with bullets (from previous tracers that were fired too close to ignite) that there was no contained pressure, but the MythBusters surmised that had the tank been properly enclosed, it may have exploded; but overall it remains extremely improbable.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 23 Jul 2010 08:15:33 -0700, Bill Murphy

The site lists no details. Was the tank full, or almost empty for the test? What was the ambient temperature?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 23 Jul 2010 11:22:10 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@mickymall.com wrote:

Details would have been in the MythBusters show itself. I'm sure a YouTube exerpt might exist if you need those details.
The point is, the suggestion that a "hunter's round" will accidentally explode plastic gas cans sitting outside is so highly unlikely, maybe even impossible, as to not be a reasonable fear.
Gasoline is very dangerous. We all know that. A leak is not good, for example. But we manage that danger every single day (almost all of us keep about 40 gallons in the garage every night, for example).
To date, nobody on this planet (not even me, after extensive searches already listed) can reference a single California law that regulates the home storage and vehicle transporation of five gallon jugs of gasoline in a car trunk.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Absolutely... The make administrative laws which govern how your car has to be inspected and what items must be inspected to get your sticker... Also how the roadways and railways under their jurisdiction are used... Lots of things are covered under administrative law...
~~ Evan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 21 Jul 2010 22:15:26 -0700, "Steve B"

The NFPA says gasoline vapor can explode. They also say that sugar dust can explode, as can sawdust.
Go argue with THEM.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Touchy, are we?

You can drop a lit match into a bucket of liquid gasoline. It will not explode. It will not burn. The match will go out.
Gasoline is only explosive when you spray a teeny tiny bit of it into a chamber with a whole bunch of oxygen, squeeze the hell out of it, and then throw in a spark.
Gasoline vapor in open air BURNS, but it has to be under the right conditions, which are rarely present at an accident scene.
Keep watching those B-grade car chase action movies and thinking that everything that happens is real.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gasoline vapor in open air BURNS, but it has to be under the right conditions, which are rarely present at an accident scene.
reply: Got your medical marijuana reupped, I see. Go to any junkyard and look at car carcasses and get back to us.
Steve
visit my blog at http://cabgbypasssurgery.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 21 Jul 2010 08:28:44 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

I'm sure fuel ignites, eventually, but I remember a MythBusters episode where they just couldn't get gasoline to light from a cigarette (IIRC).
OK. I looked it up. MythBusters Holleywood on Trial #7: It is possible to ignite a pool of gasoline using only a cigarette.
partly plausible
A cigarette has the potential to light a pool of gasoline but just doesnt have enough sustained heat. Gas ignites between 500 F and 540 F, the cigarette at its hottest was between 450 F and 500 F but only when it was actually being smoked. An ignition is very improbable.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The pool is the other part. It isn't so much the heat. When the cig is in the pool, the vapor concentration at the ember is most likely not right to light off. There is really not all that large of a range when vapor isn't too rich or too lean.
--
I want to find a voracious, small-minded predator
and name it after the IRS.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Orak Listalavostok wrote:

Right. The reason for "No Smoking" signs around gasoline is not so much that the cigarette will ignite the fumes as it is the CIGARETTE LIGHTER will ignite the fumes.
To be fair, what the signs SHOULD say is: "No lighting of cigarettes around here"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 20 Jul 2010 20:30:14 -0700, "Steve B"

Yea, take an example from BP. After all, they are experts at blowing up gas and oil.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 20 Jul 2010 20:30:14 -0700, Steve B wrote:

OSHA regulations exerpts from http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_id 673&p_table=STANDARDS
1926.152(a)(1): Approved safety cans or Department of Transportation approved containers shall be used for the handling and use of flammable liquids in quantities of 5 gallons or less ...
1926.152(b)(1): No more than 25 gallons of flammable or combustible liquids shall be stored in a room outside of an approved storage cabinet ...
1926.152(b)(2): Quantities of flammable and combustible liquid in excess of 25 gallons shall be stored in an acceptable or approved cabinet meeting the following requirements ...
1926.152(b)(3): Not more than 60 gallons of flammable or 120 gallons of combustible liquids shall be stored in any one storage cabinet. Not more than three such cabinets may be located in a single storage area. Quantities in excess of this shall be stored in an inside storage room.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_id 673&p_table=STANDARDS
I was an associate safety professional. Yes, you may cite OSHA all day long.
But you said containers of less than five gallons re: storage. What about transport? You say nothing about that.
Point is, 5 gallons, 25 gallons 60 gallons (see above), any regular guy who's been around the block a couple of times knows you can get in one hell of a mess with a cup of gasoline or less. I knew two guys who had their faces altered for life with less than a cup of gas.
Steve
visit my blog at http://cabgbypasssurgery.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

NO, sorry. You cited about 5 gallon containers for handling. Nothing stated there about storage.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 22 Jul 2010 09:45:00 -0700, Steve B wrote:

I'm trying. I really am. I want to know myself what the law is.
I gave up on the California DOT (aka Caltrans) web site as its search mechanism is a mess.
I googled for "California law gasoline portable storage container transportation and storage"
It's really hard to find the law on storage and transportation of 5-gallon gasoline containers! :(
This PDF, for example, titled "Portable Storage Containers" (http://groups.ucanr.org/ehs/files/54035.pdf ) is typical in that it gives suggestions, but, only one law is mentioned related to storage, and it isn't what we're looking for (we're looking for a volume limitation).
It says "A safety can made of a heavy-gauge metal and having a cap that automatically closes to prevent a spill if the can is dropped or tipped over is required, under California Code of Regulations Title 8, Section 3319, for storing flammable liquids like gasoline."
So, I'm still looking for any California law that covers: - How many gallons (if any limit exists) you can carry in your trunk - How many gallons (if any limit exists) you can store 'along a fence'
We all know you can carry gas in your trunk; and you can leave it along your fence; the only question is whether or not there is a legal volume limit.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Try "California definition "hazardous waste"
This site
http://ccelearn.csus.edu/wasteclass/mod2/mod2_01.html
gave this definition:
waste is a material that has been used or has otherwise served its intended purpose and, for whatever reason, can or will no longer be used. In the Title 22 CCR, a waste is defined as any discarded material (in any form, such as solid, liquid, semi-solid, or contained gas) that is not excluded by Section 66261.4(a), 66261.4(e), or 25143.2(b) or 25143.2(d).
So my prior comment was correct: as long as it is still fit for use and is not effectively "discarded" it's not waste. Now what you have to worry about is the limit for storing inflammables.
This search
california maximum gasoline storage limit
Produced this page from Chevron: http://www.chevron.com/products/prodserv/fuels/technical_safety_bulletins/ltg_storage.aspx
With this quote:
One and two and five gallon containers should carry a sticker indicating they are approved for gasoline storage by the Underwriters Laboratories (UL). A plastic container has the advantage that it will not rust if the gasoline is contaminated with water or if the container is stored in a wet place.
A 60-gallon metal drum is the only container approved by the Uniform Fire Code for the storage of more than five gallons of gasoline.
The Uniform Fire Code limits the amount of gasoline in residential buildings to the amount "necessary for maintenance purposes and operation of equipment," not to exceed a maximum of 25 gallons.
Note that local Fire Department regulations may supersede the Uniform Fire Code. When storing more that five gallons of gasoline it is best to check with your local Fire Department for local regulations.
So there is no problem for 5 gallons, you probably won't have a problem up to 25 - which is 5 five-gallon cans - but if it's more than that you are going to need to use a drum and probably a local permit or ok from the Fire Marshall.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Similar rules in MA. We can have all the hydraulic oil we want to have in machines. We can have drums of new oil to replace it with as needed. But, as soon as we take it out of a machine and put it back in a drum, it becomes hazardous waste, needs permitting to store and dispose of and has limits on how much we can have (3 drums in our case). Disposal must be with a licensed hauler, etc.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Strange. Don't the storm drains in your neighborhood need lubricating?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.