Transition from 2 1/4 wood flooring to 3 inch


I have 3 inch floorin gin a dinning orom and carpet in the adjoining living room. I got a good deal on some 2 1/4 inch flooring that nearly matches the three inch. Is there a good was to transition from one size to another to make the size difference less apparant? The rooms are separated by a wide "doorway" without the door.
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stryped wrote:

that's what they make thresholds for. i'd use a nice marble or granite one that was the same height as the wood flooring.
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wrote:

I guess what I am really aying is, is there a way to minimize the visual aspect of the size difference? Bothe sets of wood are 3/4 inch tall. One is 2 1/4 inch wide and the other is 3.
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If you make the saddle the width of the door frame it won't look all that bad. The two floors will be separated by enough that the eye won't follow the lines from one floor to the other. You might try a piece 4-1/2" wide of 5/4 wood of the same species as the floor as your saddle. A contrasting stain might be nice too. That way you don't have to match anything perfectly.
The other alternative is to run the boards on the new floor orthogonally to the old floor. What you're really trying to do is make it so the joints don't line up - almost.
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snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Got a router, or know someone who does? A buddy of my brothers, three cities ago, had a similar situation. He found a wide plank of the same wood for the threshold, routed a design in it, and filled the grooves with wood of different colors. Pinned it all together with epoxy so it wouldn't fall out, and urethaned the hell out of the top. Nobody notices that the floors on either side don't exactly match.
--
aem sends...

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stryped wrote the following:

Tell people not to look down at the floor.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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He told you how to do it.
Put a threshold between the two to break up the pattern and you won't notice the difference.
If you try to "hide" it somehow people will fall on their face from vertigo as they walk from one room to the other.
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I ripped some oak and adjusted the thickness to make a transition between laid hardwood flooring in the kitchen and marble in the hallway, plus carpet in a couple other areas.
--
Nonny
Suppose you were an idiot.
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wrote:

T-molding ?
http://www.armstrong.com/flooring/i/images/molding_wood_t_molding.jpg
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Since it "nearly matches", that means it doesn't match exactly, so even if they were the same width you'd see a difference if you put them right next to each other..
How about installing a threshold in the doorway that doesn't match either flooring?
I couldn't get the full size image to load, but go to Google Images and enter this search term:
threshold between rooms
Look at the bottom pictures in the second and forth columns for ideas.
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stryped wrote:

Is your dining room flooring parallel or perpendicular to the living room entrance?
--Betsy
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parallel
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You might think creatively about how to work the transition, just using wood flooring. Put in a few perpendicular strips in the transition area, maybe in a different wood, or some parquet, or something like that to break it up visually. But keep it all at the same level. Don't use a threshold that sticks up if you can avoid it. Also, stick with wood - I think if you used granite or slate or something the difference in material might make a slip/fall hazard even if it was all level. -- H
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If the wood in the doorway width is installed either at right angles, or maybe in some sort of diagonal or diamond pattern, the difference in the two rooms will be hard to notice because the human eye will be more attracted to the interesting design within the doorway width.
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On Mon, 5 Apr 2010 20:16:39 -0700 (PDT), "hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net"

The problem with diagonals is that if you're not careful you'll tend to see the difference in lines on either side. If the diagonals line up or even come close to lining up on one side and not the other it'll look just as bad as the two floors meeting. The design and spacing has to be carefully chosen.
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If you search for "wood floor transition" on Google images you will get some examples - like this one:
http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d200/HomeImprovementNinja2/a7542c97.jpg
You have to sift through - lots of them are transitions from wood to tile and so forth. -- H
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