"transformer" for 220v to 110 outlet.

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I saw a 240v generator on Ebay that came with a 240-120 converter; so they do exist and can't be all that expensive.
Since no one has referred you to a source WHY NOT DO A GOOGLE SEARCH?
An interesting problem though... A 120v outlet in your garage has to be GFCI. Would a converter in your garage have to be GFCI? Donno.
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He needs a GFCI on it, too. (It's in a garage.)

-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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Travis posted

In alt.home.repair on 28 Feb 2005 09:04:39 -0800 snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com posted:

That's basically what Travis is recommending. If you have 4 slots, and not 3, in the dryer outlet.

I bet you could do this, or get someone to do it for you. There are only four wires and they are already connected at the plug end.
You can get what they called a pigtail, a replacement cord with the standard dryer plug on the end, for a dryer, at a hardware store.
Also get a surface mount 110 volt receptacle (also called an outlet). Surface mount means that it screws to the outside of the wall, doesn't have to be mounted inside the wall to look right. These boxes have a lot more space in them than most "receptacle-ends" of extension cordds, and pros don't seem to like cords that aren't firmly fixed to a wall. This *is* the only place in the house you'll be able to use this cord, so there is little reason not to screw it to the wall, right?
You connect the black or the red wire -- it doesn't matter which -- of the cord to the gold contact of the receptacle. You cut off the other wire, the red or the black, or you cover the end with a wire nut or tape*** so that the wire inside doesn't touch anything. You connect the white wire to the silver screw of the receptacle, and you connect the bare wire to a green screw on the receptacle, or whatever is labelled the ground screw.
All of this can be assembled *before* you plug it in to the dryer outlet.
The only way you can come up with more than 110 volts would be if you used both the red and the black wires of the cord, and you won't do that, will you?:)
***Others here can tell you what is best.
Meirman -- If emailing, please let me know whether or not you are posting the same letter. Change domain to erols.com, if necessary.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

on 240), but methinks a step-down transformer for a high-current motorized device like a treadmill is going to be a bit on the spendy side.
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Before he even gets to that, why not figure out what the load from the washer and the treadmill are together. There may not even be a problem. Or alternatively, don't use the treadmill when the washer is running.
Short of that, I agree that any stepdown device is going to be quite expensive to have enough capacity to run a treadmill. The easy and correct solution is to just run another outlet. Since it's a basement, that should be pretty easy and/or reasonable to have done.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

exercise while running the washer and dryer, and if the breaker trips, then move onto plan B (with the cheapest plan B being "don't run the treadmill while doing the laundry"). If you just gotta run the treadie while doing the laundry, then a 50' high-capacity outdoor extension cord isn't all that expensive.
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In alt.home.repair on Mon, 28 Feb 2005 12:42:28 -0700 Andy Hill

Better yet, Harry, with a few pullies and drive belts, and the removal of the access panel at the rear of washer, you could connect the treadmill to the washer.
For normal loads, Jack would run at 6 to 8 miles an hour, and for lingerie and other delicates he would walk at about 2 miles and hour.
With a mirror on the inside of the washer lid, Jack could get visual feedback on how the laundry was doing.
He wouldn't need any electricity to run either the dryer or the treadmill.

W
Meirman -- If emailing, please let me know whether or not you are posting the same letter. Change domain to erols.com, if necessary.
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If a person know some about wiring, it is possible to get a 110 volt circuit from a 220 volt dryer setup. It might not be legal or to code, but it is quite possible.
--

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Your going to spend more on the transformer and related equipment than running a new circuit.
You COULD, remove the 220v outlet and breaker get a 20 amp breaker and outlet. Change the wiring around so that one of the hots becomes a neutral and you would have an new 120v recpt to code. Better check with a pro in your area if this is possible.
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step 1: open yellow pages
step 2: look under electricians
step3: start making calls
Seriously, If you don't have the skills, leave it to a pro. It's money well spent, and the life (and home) you save "WILL" be your own.
Be careful!
Les
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Jeeze! Try it and see if the circuit flips.
If it doesn't, you're golden.
If the circuit flips, THEN worry about how to overcome the problem.
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The transformer large enough to run the motor on your tread mill would be pretty large, and somewhat expensive. If the 240 volt outlet is unused, get an electrician over to convert it over to 120 volt. It should not be a big deal. Greg
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