Transfer switch or cutoff switch?

Page 2 of 2  
Knowing nothing I'll add my two pence from that standpoint. I consulted with a licensed and well experienced electrician. He installed a transfer switch wich was $500 and his labor, another $400 as I recall and it works on the alloted circuits as proven by a two day outage last year. It seems to me that when you choose to energize the entire house on a small generator you could overload it accidentally. And, as I said, since I don't know anything about electricity I assume that this could cause a catastrophic accident. No ones life is worth a savings of any amount of money.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I wouldn't be energizing the entire house, only select circuits to ge by. I'm debating the options of transfer switch or a master cutof switch which would cut power off before the meter. I'd know for certai that the utility power is off before I could backfeed. I'm not committe to either option at the moment, I'm researching before I decide. M power comes out of the ground up to about 5' to the meter. The powe exits the meter from behind(into the wall) and into a perpendicula interior wall about 5' to the breaker box. The breaker box is confine in a narrow spot.(Not much room for a transfer switch). My neighbor' house has a meter with a master cutoff box next to it with a lever o it. The power exits the cutoff switch from behind to his breaker box To me, that's a positive way to cutoff power from the pole. I hav nothing between the meter and the breaker box but the main breaker. I' not opposed to a transfer switch, it's just that it would be difficul in my situation.
C & M Wrote:

-- rh45 ----------------------------------------------------------------------- rh455's Profile: http://www.homeplot.com/member.php?userid=2 View this thread: http://www.homeplot.com/showthread.php?tV39
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I can't take this anymore; gotta speak up.
A Transfer Switch, properly installed, automatically disconnects the wired ckts from the mains, meter, incoming power, whatever you want to call it, all in ONE motion, and gives thos ckts to the generator ONLY.
A cutoff switch, though functional enough, is ANOTHER added action in order to isolate the generator from the power coming in. First you have to throw the cutoff switch, then hook up your generator - at LEAST two steps, easily forgotten/mixed up in an emergency. With a transfer switch, you can monitor the power being used with the meter, how much is on which leg, and even control what can or can't run. With a cutoff switch, after you get the generator hooked up and running, then you have to be sure you turn off several breakers, or go around and make sure "extra" things aren't running. With a transfer switch, using it assures you disconnected from the incoming power by virtue of its design. A cutoff switch just disconnects the whole house and that's all. With a transfer switch, you can still know when power comes back. Not so with a cutoff switch.
Some codes still require a cutoff switch regardless of whether you use a transfer switch or not, because they predate transfer switches for residences. Yes, I have a transfer switch. Yes, I used it during the Ice Storm on '98, for 5 days, in fact. No, I'm not required to have a cutoff switch. My installation was inspected and passed with flying colors. Best to check on local codes.
Just my two cents
Pop
message

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Pop wrote:

Pop What you are calling a transfer switch is a transfer panel that contains a number of transfer switches. I don't make that distinction to split hairs but rather to point out that a transfer switch is simpler to operate and provides more flexibility in which loads you can run. A transfer panel offers better control but less flexibility in load selection.
Each of the switches in a transfer panel is a transfer switch that controls a single load or circuit. One advantage of that arrangement is that you can transfer the selected loads and still leave some load connected to the utility to indicate the return of public power. Another advantage is that you greatly limit the likelihood of overloading the generator to the point were it's Over Current Protective Device opens and darkens the whole house again.
A double throw switch, or a pair of single throw switches that are interlocked, which controls the entire supply to the home allows you to run any load in the home up to the limit of the generators capacity. -- Tom Horne
"This alternating current stuff is just fad. It is much too dangerous for general use." Thomas Alva Edison
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
....

===> Your comments are correct of course, but what a person sees when he approaches mine is "Transfer Switch" on the label. In many parlance it's common to call a "box" of something by the singular form; thus I suppose a "box" of transfer switches is "a" transfer switch. Google for "tansfer switch" and you won't get the individual 3-position (or 2 position) switches, you'll get a bunch of sites calling a "box" of transfer switches a transfer switch, singular. It just makes sense and is logical. I have a feeling we're on opposite sides of the high\\low voltage equation?
One can go as far as they wish with definitions, but it's generally best to go with what is "common" or "perceived" usages. If someone asks you what a transfer switch is, you're probably going to continue describing dtdt, dptt, tptt and so on, but it would have served no purpose to the post, IMO. But I would describe it as a box with a set of switches to isolate your generator from the mains lines. Which is by far more accurate than trying to describe one of the internal switches, in view of the current usage.
So, I'm at a loss as to just what the heck you are trying to communicate in your post. Were you adding to, subtracting from, or otherwise trying to correct/revise something I said? You did address it specifically to me, so it has to be my post your are referring to. If so, come out and say it. I'm not aware that I gave any bad advice to the posters, so if there's something wrong, be specific.
I don't bite :-)
Pop
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Pop What he means is, a transfer switch panel and a master transfer switch are similar, but the "panel" transfers power to the circuits from the generator/utility. A transfer "switch" is one large switch in the main line that transfers power to the whole breaker box from the generator/utility instead of individual circuits. That's the point. You can get a transfer panel to power selected circuits or a general switch to backfeed the whole board which in my case is much more convienent for me.
--
rh455
------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There are all kind of switches and difficulties of installation, so the prices you give might be right for some. But for normal installation of a 7500w switch, it should be about half of that. (having just done one...)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.