Trailer Hinges: How To Refinish

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You can buy zinc for about $2.00/lb.
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dadiOH
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<stuff snipped>

I've found with dipped coatings (I use a rubberized dip on pliers and other tools) you have to use more coats/dips than the manufacturer typically recommends. It's like paint, fertilizer or anything like that - they very often overstate the coverage to make the product seem more economical.
Once a pit or surface imperfection of any kind occurs, the corrosion process can work from the inside out. The thicker the coating, the more resistant it becomes to mechanical damage that can lead to corrosion. The obvious problems you face are that some items won't function correctly with too heavy a coating and as DadiOH pointed, mechanical wear may strip even the heaviest coating eventually.
You may have to save some of the coating material in a touch-up bottle and inspect the unit from time to time for signs of coating wear and treat accordingly.
--
Bobby G.




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On Friday, August 2, 2013 7:49:44 AM UTC-4, dadiOH wrote:

I don't know if I'd go to all the above steps, but agree in general with the approach. I was thinking wire brush off all the loose, rusted stuff and then use one of the Rustoleum primers designed for rusty areas, followed by two Rustoleum top coats.
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Thanks, but...and then what?
What would you suggest I use as a finish coat? Reading the instructions for the Cold Galvenizing Compound seems to indicate that any type of primer wouldn't make sense because you want the compound to interact with the metal itself.
It's not 100% clear to me yet, but it appears the CG compound can be applied over rust to transform it as well as hide it. Obviously loose, flaking rust needs to be removed, but apparently not all of it.
Thoughts?
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On Friday, August 2, 2013 11:54:43 AM UTC-4, DerbyDad03 wrote:

The long and short of it is nothing you do will ever be permanent. You will have to clean and recoat every few years to keep the rust at bay.
In order for the paint/coating/whatever to "revent rust" it has to have 100% perfect preparation, 100% perfect adhesion, and can never ever get chipped dinged worn scratched in any way.
In other words, it's impossible. You will notice that when you read the guarantees on these "no rust" products: "We say it won't rust, but if it does it's your fault because you didn't apply the paint properly to a properly prepared surface."
All it takes is missing one little speck of rust in your prep, one little ding or scratch, and rust will soon take over.
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If your plannmng on keeping the trailer forever replace all the hardware with NON MAGNETIC STAINLESS,,,,,
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On Friday, August 2, 2013 8:02:13 AM UTC-5, bob haller wrote:

Yeah that is probably the right answer
Electrolytic derusting will prep the metal the best you can if you want to try painting the old ones again
I like the idea of cold galvanizing paint. POR-15 is another option. However pretty much any good paint should work well if you electrolytically derust as the surface will not have any rust to spread and will have decent tooth for adhesion.
nate
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

Rustoleum Professional Cold Galvanizing Compound - Silver http://preview.tinyurl.com/l2qzsqf
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Bought it last night. :-)
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

OK. Good Luck. Let us know how it works out (in a couple of years). :-)
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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DerbyDad03;3101369 Wrote: >

> (http://preview.tinyurl.com/l2qzsqf )[/i][/color]

I would have at least found out how much nickel plating your parts would cost before buying that cold galvanizing compound. You might have found that the nickel plating would only be a few dollars more, and you KNOW nickel plating is gonna work well. There's no question in my mind about that.
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nestork


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On Saturday, August 3, 2013 11:14:32 AM UTC-5, nestork wrote:

I suspect that anything is only going to last a couple years anyway. Unles s the hinge pins are removable, there is no way to coat/plate them with any thing, and even if they are, there will be wear between the hinge pieces an d the pins eventually developing corrosion. The only set and forget it fix is a set of stainless hinges, or hinges made from some other corrosion res istant metal.
Even an excellent job will still result in brown rust dust creeping out in the actual working areas of the hinge after a while unless it's religiously oiled.
nate
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On 8/3/2013 8:20 AM, willshak wrote:

I've use something similar by another manufacturer to help protect steel parts in a cooling tower. ^_^
TDD
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<stuff snipped>

Thanks for the pointer. Just put it on my Home Depot shopping list. Apparently the "magic" of the product is that it contains lots of powdered zinc. It will be interesting to see how it holds up. Seems to require a pretty clean and well-prepped surface for maximum adhesion and that's sometimes a problem with items that are difficult to clean well before painting.
On a slightly related subject I was talking to an Army surgeon this weekend at barbeque held by my wife's old USAR unit. He was really pissed that the Army was forcing them to use Pakistani made stainless steel surgical instruments because he's already had one break during surgery - he named the scissor - it's used for cutting tendons - but I forgot what they're called.
His other complaint is how easily much of the foreign-made stainless steel equipment develops discoloration spots that never appeared on American-made surgical tools. The perils of going with the lowest bid, I suppose.
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Bobby G.



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You might want to put it on your Lowe's shopping list. My local HD only carries the Cold Galvanizing Compound which is flat grey, not silver. My local Lowe's carries Bright Galvanizing Compound, which, going by the cap cover, does appear to the more silver than grey.
I cleaned up my hinges and other trailer parts yesterday. I'll be using the Bright compound tonight. I'll post some pictures when I'm done.
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