Tradeoffs: Casement vs Double-Hung Windows?

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wrote:

My wife wanted casements, I wanted double-hung because of the cosmetics. and casements having cranks that can fail. After seeing how the windows would look, we went with casements. We got more light with casements. Vinyl windows, I don't know the brand. They are all have screens. After 9 years one crank window (out of 13) sometimes needs assistance to reach the latching point. Appears to sag a bit when left open for a few days. We don't open them often, fair summer weather only. Sliders were installed in the basement, and they take more strength to open, although not an excessive amount. As far as breezes go, the windows are mostly installed in pairs, and swing out in opposite directions, so opening one does the trick. You actually get more air when the wind hits them, as it "catches" the breeze and channels it inside the house. With double-hungs you only get half of the window space open, so they're not as good at ventilating. One thing that I keep my eye on is high winds. I close the windows because I feel it puts too much strain on the mechanisms. That's for high winds only, say 30mph gusts. So it really depends on house style and quality of the windows. I'm happy with the casement style. Didn't think I would be, growing up with double-hungs. But the quality is there.
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Casement windows provide the maximum amount of open space. Single hung, double hung or sliding windows will provide no more than - less than, actually - 50% of the window area when open.
I've never seen or heard of a casement window opening inward; no reason why they can't though. The ones that open vertically I call "awning" or "hopper" windows depending upon whether they hinge at the top or bottom of the panes. I especially like the top hinged ones as they can be left open when raining unless the rain is being blown nearly horizontally.
Generally, casements only open 90 degrees which means there needs to be space for the open window. It also means they can be opened to catch and divert a breeze.
Casements will generally seal tighter when closed as opposed to other types.
Casements are generally more expensive.
Some casements use rather cheaply made cranks which can fail; however, they are easily replaceable if need be.
Around here, most all "hung" windows are single hung. The operating mechanism with which I am familiar is a spring affair in each side track; that device can and does get out of whack requiring replacement or adjustment. It also affords a way to easily remove and/or tilt the bottom sash; the top sash is fixed. With double hung, both sashes are moveable whhich means they the top sash is more easily cleaned; very useful for 2nd story windows.
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dadiOH
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On 3/11/2014 10:56 AM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

If the casements you are looking at doesn't include screens then maybe you should look elsewhere. We have all casements that open out (like a double door), the screens are on the inside and easily removed for cleaning the screens as well as the inside of the windows. Modern casements are every bit as good as double hung and even have optional fold away cranks so they don't interfere with curtains or blinds.
John
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replying to John, LolaR wrote: I have a casement windows that I purchased from Heritage Home Design . There are actually a lot of benefits in using casement windows. They can be fully opened compared to other windows like double hung and fixed windows. They have fewer muntins, muntins are strips of wood or metal that divides panes of glass within a single window. Casement windows has an open sash that can funnel the breeze into your house They are very difficult to break into.Casement locks are hook shaped and these hooks are embedded within the frame making them very hard to break into.
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