Tracking down AFCI faults

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On Tue, 23 Feb 2016 00:29:06 -0500, "Texas Kingsnake"

You got away easy. My panel replacement and GFCI upgrades, including 1 AFCI and several 2 pole GFCI breakers and 4 GFCI outlets - 125 amp panel, and inspections didn't give me much change from $3G

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Have you ever used a megger (Megohmmeter insulation tester)? I own one but the meters can be rented. It could be one thing you could to check the questionable circuit. You could compare readings from the good circuits to the bad one to give you some idea where the fault is. It should be a lot of fun. ^_^
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megohmmeter
http://www.ehow.com/how_5202652_use-megohmmeter.html
[8~{} Uncle Faulty Monster =========================================Thanks for the info. I see them on Amazon for around $60. Great for motor work, it seems, not sure I would use it much. If the fault doesn't clear easily, I will run new circuits which, in an unfinished basement, is far less work than playing cable detective looking for the Maltese Arc Fault. Gets me new, 12 gage wire with ground and GFCI, too. The boxes used in this house won't accommodate the GFCIs I've tried to stuff in them.
Learned another interesting trick. In an unfinished basement you can mount GFCI feeder outlets near the panel so that when something blows, all the circuit breakers and GFCI's are in one location. Better to use GFCI breakers, I know, but those fraking things cost a fortune! Anyone know of the NEC limits how many outlets you can have in one room or area?
TKS
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On Wed, 24 Feb 2016 00:54:06 -0500, "Texas Kingsnake"

No limit. You could "paper" the walls with them as long as you can manage all the cable runs in a code compliant manner - neat and workmanlike - Good workmanship, or however they state it.
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On Monday, February 22, 2016 at 11:20:32 PM UTC-5, Texas Kingsnake wrote:

I don't understand that test methodology at all. Which side of the AFCI are they telling you to plug into the receptacle? And even if somehow this could detect a fault and trip, so what? It tells you that the fault is somewhere on the circuit, which you already know.

You have an AFCI doing what it's supposed to do, tripping, indicating that you have a potentially serious problem that could burn the house down. And your reaction is to replace it with a regular breaker?

The circuit is daisy-chained. The logical thing to do is:
1 - Remove all the plug-in loads
2 - Pick a receptacle, switch, or junction box near the middle of the run. Disconnect everything downstream and see if it still trips. Then continue the process on the half that has the fault.
This isn't anywhere near as bad as you're making it sound, at least not so far. I could have it isolated in an hour. You say isolating the fault is more work than running two new receptacles? I doubt that. And what good is running two new receptacles if you don't know which parts of that existing circuit contain the fault?
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