Tool handles

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On Sat, 22 Sep 2007 08:36:22 -0700, "SteveB"

The old joke goes "it is the one George Washington used to chop down the cherry tree".
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Easy -- use the right amount of hardener. If it sets instantly (or anything even approaching that) you're using waaaaay too much.
It sets faster at higher temperatures, too.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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May be no help where you are, but this is the stuff on the right hand side of the little pond:-
http://www.milliput.co.uk/home.htm
I'm sure I've also seen a USA'n type, but I'm buggered if I can remember the name it went by.
regards Mark Rand RTFM
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Home Depot..Plumbing section "Oatey" brand..comes ina clear plastic tube about 1" Dia X 10" long w/ red cap on end. About 6 bucks
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Any epoxy/fiberglass supplier should be able to sell you "epoxy filler" which is what you are looking for. Or you can mix your own by first mixing epoxy resin and hardener and then adding a substance to thicken the mix. This thickener can range from talcum powder to micro balloons to carbo sil to wood dust to just about anything depending on how hard you want the results to be.
Bruce in Bangkok (brucepaigeATgmailDOTcom)
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You must not have much in the way of stores where you are. All the major hardware chains around here have one or more types of two-strip putty on the peg as do the major auto parts chains. Devcon is one brand, J-B Weld has some also. There's some stuff in the plumbing areas in most of the big-box home improvement joints supposed to stop leaks, but I've used it, it's crap. Best sort I've used is the one with the resin surrounding the hardener in sort of a "hot-dog" configuration. That's the two-strip sort of putty. The True Value also has a two-part putty that comes in film containers stuck in the ends of a cardboard tube, haven't seen it elsewhere, X-11 I think is the name. Good stuff, also available in white, which is good for porcelain light socket and plumbing fixture repairs. As with any of it, temperature makes a big difference in setup time. None of it is cheap, though.
If you can find a real hardware store, they'll have a lot of replacement handles, maybe not as cheap as what you can find replacement chink tools, though. If you've got good Ames or Collins shovels and tools, they're worth new handles. Also, a cheap storage shed will prevent a recurrance of the problem.
Stan
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On Fri, 21 Sep 2007 21:34:28 +0000, Rich Grise wrote: ...

Yeah, I know, bad form to reply to myself, but there are too many great answers to reply individually!
Thanks All! Rich
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SteveB wrote:

Marine grade epoxy resin. Carefully push into cracks and coat surface, wrap a layer of fiberglass cloth, saturate cloth with the epoxy and then wrap with release paper. When cured remove release paper, sand and paint with quality marine grade paint.
Or just buy a new fiberglass handle for the tool...
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I filled the cracks in my old shovel handles, and the handles on my wheelbarrow, with epoxy and wood flour (sawdust is good enough). Then I sanded and painted with thinned varnish; sanded lightly again and rubbed in linseed oil. Six months later, when the linseed was dry, they were good as new. d8-)
You never know with linseed. If the surface is really porous, it takes forever to dry. Other times, if the surface is completely filled and you're putting on only a very thin coat, it dries in a few days.
-- Ed Huntress
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Boiled linseed oil will undo the drying effect; start with that, put a coating of external stain over it to keep UV at bay. Alas, the handles will become slippery.
If you need more friction, a seal coat of shellac (should go over the linseed oil) will do it, but won't like wet afterward. Can't have everything.
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