Tool for Driving Ground Rod

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On Saturday, 15 December 2012 08:34:32 UTC-5, bob haller wrote:

Code here sez ground rods must be driven, not buried; but can be driven at up to a 45-degree angle to avoid bedrock when needed. http://bit.ly/TzFX7C
No mention of watering the ground, but if it erodes earth away from the rod it's probably increasing your ground resistance.
But ground *plates* can be buried. I hadn't heard of such a thing until last summer when I decided I wanted a ground outside the house for a new TV antenna mast (rather than running the ground wire directly into the house to get to the ground lug on the water pipe). Cheap, and the kids briefly found that watching Dad dig a hole in the yard was a viable alternative to YouTube, though they seemed to expect me to whack myself with the shovel.
Like others, I doubt that lack of a proper ground is behind your GFI problem. My guess is that you've got a partial short on the circuit that first caused the breaker to trip, maybe from a nail in the wall or maybe from a flaky connection; and repeated tripping weakened that breaker. Try putting a new known-good GFI breaker on that second circuit. If it works properly for a while, move it to the circuit that first caused the tripping. If it starts to trip, you've got a real problem on that circuit. If it works ok on that circuit, you've got no problem at all, just had a couple of bad breakers.
A neutral-to-ground short, even one with some resistance, will trip a GFI since the return current will split itself partly to the ground wire, and the GFI will see it missing from the neutral. Maybe somewhere on that circuit an outlet or switch has shifted to the point where the neutral screw is touching the grounded box. Of course, if there is truly zero load on that circuit, that wouldn't explain it. If there is really no load at all then the fault must involve the hot leg, and that's something you really should track down.
Chip C Toronto
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A large 1" or larger electric drill and an auger should be rentable from your local tool rental house. After you drill the hole, as you put the rod down, add a lot of salt to the dirt you back-fill with to increase the ground conductivity. Also use a hose to help moisten and pack the dirt so that you have good conductivity between the rod and ground.
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wrote:

these days ground rods arent copper they are copper clad steel. rock salt can make your new rod disappear........
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One time I was asked to drive some rebar, to reinforce some steps outdoors leading to a beach. I ground the endsof the rebar to a point, on a bench grinder. Seemed to help.
Does your ground rod have a point on the down end?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
The last time I put in a ground rod at this house, it took me a full day with a pipe-style post-pounder, and another day to recover. The soil here is about an inch thich over serious hardpan.
I've decided that I need another ground rod, closer to the service entrance panel, to keep the GFCI breakers from tripping needlessly.
I'd be willing to buy a power tool to do this, if it doesn't cost more than $50 or so, and would do the job in 1/2-hour or less. Does such a beast exist?
--
Thanks,
croy



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