Tool advice

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Very good suggestion. No, I don;t need to get an assortment, unles the price (for the collection) is so much better and I was going to replace a number of tools, anyway. I'l also look into the pneumatic tools, since many seem to think they are a better choice.
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I own and like the air tools too. I got a deal on a good compressor and added air tools as my situation dictated. I now have a brad nailer, 15g angle finish nailer, stapler and framing nailer and paint sprayer. Bought one at a time as I had a need for them. Porter cable has some nice starter outfits for a good price that may get you started.

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Harry wrote:

Different lines have different strengths and weaknesses. If you have a fetish to have all of your tools look the same, then you'll probably still do all right, but you'll have a situation where you could have made slightly better choices here and there.
Spend some time at Google Groups on this. There's enough information already out there to last you the rest of the year in reading time.
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Corded drill - Milwaukie Cordless drill - Panasonic Skill saw - PC Sawboss or Skill 77 if you want a monster Reciprocating Saw - Bosch Jig Saw - Delta
As you can see there is no one perfect brand. You need to choose each tool individually. These are my favorites but do your own research.

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My powered hand held tools. All are corded except the Ryobi. Most of the Craftsman tools are 15 -20 years old.
Craftsman: Scroll saw, 1/2" drill, 3/8" vsr drill/driver, 3" belt sander, Pad sander, Router. Makita: Palm sander, Reciprocating saw, Drywall screwdriver Ryobi: 18v cordless vsr drill/driver B&D: 7-1/4" circular saw. Skil: Worm drive circular saw. Rotozip: Original, bought from TV when first advertised.
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This is not an easy question. Tradesmen are probably the only people with experience with more than one brand of any given tool, and they use the high end tools that most DIYs would not want to sink all their money in, especially for tools that we use, frankly, rarely. A lot of opinions are based on outdated information. Companies that once made quality tools may now be making an inferior grade, so a DIY who swears by his 25 year old B&D is telling the truth, but that opinion may not be relevant to today's B&D. Few of us have had the opportunity to use competing current versions of tools; where can you get that type of information? I really don't know. I don't think you can tell by going into HD and looking. Maybe try renting, but they seem to have only one brand of any tool that they will rent.
I don't have many pneumatic tools; using them is just more hassle than picking up a batteried tool; maybe if I were in more of a production environment, pneumatic would be worth the cost and inconvenience, but I don't think most DIYs are in that situation. I find myself spending often on new hoses, and I don't think I get my money's worth out of that type of tool.
Having said that, I have a Bosch belt sander that is a superb tool, and a Makita palm sander that has worked well for many many years, but I also have a Ryobi corded reciprocating saw (very light use) and batteried drill (relatively heavy use), and both of these have lasted well and do good work, yet Ryobi is often considered one of the low end brands.
One suggestion I would make is that, if you are going to get some batteried tools, get the highest voltage you can afford (18 is far far better than 14), and try to find a brand that is good across the board, so you can interchange batteries.
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