toilet wax seal question

Concrete floor. Metal ring well fastened directly to floor. Ring surrounded by ceramic tile approximately 5/16 inches high. Because of this height do I need to add a second wax ring seal or is one enough? All replies appreciated. Ivan Veg vary
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On 1/13/2014 2:26 PM, Ivan Vegvary wrote:

Just grab an X-Tra thick wax ring and that should be it.
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On Mon, 13 Jan 2014 12:26:22 -0800 (PST), Ivan Vegvary

I would NEVER use 2 rings - they make extra thisk rings for that exact situation
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On Monday, January 13, 2014 8:02:41 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

+1
And the boxes at the stores should tell you what spacing they will accomodate.
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I actually like them better than wax too..
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On Monday, January 13, 2014 12:26:22 PM UTC-8, Ivan Vegvary wrote:

Waxless seals rule. I don't understand why anyone would ever use a wax ring anymore.
Harry K
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wrote:

The one with the "funnel" to keep water and waste from the actual seal is fantastic.
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On 1/14/2014 12:28 AM, Harry K wrote:

I can see a couple of reasons.
Tradition, old plumbers don't always want to switch from what works.
Cost, even though it is a $15,000 bathroom remodel the plumber saves a buck.
They work. I have two toilets in my house. The downstairs was replaced twice since the house was built 35 years go. The upstairs replaced just this week and the ring worked well for all 35 years.
Based on past history, both of these toilets will still be in place when I'm gone, so I don't really care what was used.
In my situation, the toilets stayed in place from installaction to the time they were replaced. If you have to remove and re-install them every couple of years I can see where it may make a difference.
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On Tuesday, January 14, 2014 7:34:46 AM UTC-8, Ed Pawlowski wrote:



Considering the time savings on installing them the waxless wins the economy argument.

Waxless work also. I have never seen a report of a waxless failing - wax rings can and do fail.

So you have never installed either a waxless or a wax ring I take it. Do it once and you will be convert to waxless.
Basically the only reason one, including plumbers, would use a wax ring anynmore is:
Tradition (old is better and I know them) Some sort of problem with the piping that won't allow a waxless.
Harry K
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On 1/14/2014 10:57 AM, Harry K wrote:

Possibly if getting a flat rate for the job, but if you are getting paid by the hour, longer is better.

In my life, I've installed one wax ring, probably 25 years ago. I don't recall having any type of problem or time drain to install it.
My toilet upstairs was just set yesterday and I don't know what he used as I was not there. Based on my experience as a one time installer and long time user/owner, I have no preference. Thinking back to my previous house. we had a new toilet put in when we bought it and it was still sitting in the same place 15 years later when we moved. Probably was wax in 1966. It worked.
If you use them and have a preference, I'm OK with that, but nothing in my experience shows different. They all have worked for as long as needed. How do you improve on 100% performance?
Your experience if different so waxless is probably better for you.
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I've lost track of how many wax rings I've installed. There have been remodels of both bathrooms, one twice. There have been toilets that we didn't like. There have been kids. Kids caused most of the issues by dropping non-toilet-friendly items into the bowl, forcing an R&R. I always kept a spare wax ring in the shop for those occasions. Beat running to the store just to R&R a toilet.
I've only had one leaky toilet and it wasn't because of the wax ring, it was because the cast iron flange cracked.
All that said, I didn't know about the wax less rings until recently, so I can't speak to them, good or bad. The best I can say is that the next time I need to pull a toilet, I'll consider a wax less ring, based on the glowing reports I've heard about them.
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*They make closet ring extensions: https://www.google.com/search?q=closet+flange+extension+ring&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=hjfVUu7rEfCvsQT7lYFA&ved GAQsAQ&biw0&bihF6
I forget what it is, but a certain type of caulk must be used on the extension where it seats on the closet flange.
You might also need extra long bolts which are available.
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