Toilet-to-wall distance


I bought a new shower/tub surround that specs the alcove to be 60-1/8" between rough-in walls. Based on that, the center of the toilet drain (fixed into the concrete floor) to the rough wall would be 10-3/8", assuming a straight 90-degree wall. I plan to use 1/2" greenwall reducing this new distance to 9-7/8". I havn't purchased a toilet yet but I'm concerned there may not be enough space. Would it be better to purchase a toilet before installing the wall? When I looked at other installed toilets each had various sized gaps (1/8" to 1-1/4") between the tank and the wall. My other options might be
1. Using thinner greenboard or panels for walls 2. Slightly angle the wall to make a toilet-to-wall custom fit 3. Put a small jog in the wall
What makes this so confusing is all the different toilet dimensions.
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Whats the tub to do with the toilet drain?

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"Rough-in" dimensions for toilets can be 10", 12" or 14". With 12" most common.
I find the term rough-in a little confusing since it's actually the dimension from the toilet discharge centerline to the back of the tank.
imo nothing rough there, better have a least that much room from waste line centerline to finished wall (drywall or tile surface).
But you're in luck there is a "fitting" called an offset closet flange that can be used to bump the waste line centerline, I think you can get 1.5" or 2" offset but using one will require some concrete demo. :(
Otherwise you could fool around with making the wall between the tub & the toilet "thinner".
I assumed that the toilet backed up against the wall between the toliet area & the tub?
I recently (well, not that recently) went through the headache of having a rough in dimension too small. They didn't account for the wall mud & tile when the bathroom was built in 1930. I struggled with getting a 1930 wall tank (cracked) out & replaced with "no room" to spare. I should have dismounted the toilet, chipped away some tile & mud and installed an offset to make my life easier. .....next time.
cheers Bob
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BobK207 wrote:

I went to New Orleans a couple of years ago when my church was sponsoring the rehab of a flooded church building. The church had 18" brick and stone walls.
Once upon a time, someone decided they needed a bathroom, and for some reason the rough-in for the plumbing was too close to the wall. Instead of going under the *wooden* floor and moving the plumbing, they chiseled a four-inch "grotto" into the exterior wall so the toilet would fit.
I wish I had a picture....
--
Steve Bell
New Life Home Improvement
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Round bowl vs. elongated toilets have different distances from the drain center to the wall. What kind are you thinking about installing?
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The rough-in dimension has nothing to do with the shape of the bowl.
R
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The rough-in dimension has nothing to do with the shape of the bowl.
R
Agreed, The different shapes come in a variety of rough-in sizes.
Colbyt
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12 12 6 is general rule of thumb copper pipe is 6 inches up wall 12 inches from center line of toilet and waste is 12 inches from rough wall

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No, the waste drain on elongated toilets is further from the rear wall than the one on a round bowl. Guess you haven't installed too many toilets ;-)
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I guess you're confused. ;)
Here's one toilet available in both round and elongated bowls and the spec sheets showing the same rough-in and distance from the wall dimensions. http://www.totousa.com/admin/upload/pdfspc/s-cst716-1202.pdf http://www.totousa.com/admin/upload/pdfspc/%20s-cst715-0503.pdf
Maybe you should call the manufacturers and tell them their spec sheets are wrong. I'm sure they'd love to hear from you.
R
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Unless you are a plumber, I would guess that I have installed at least as many in this lifetime as you have.
I stand by what I posted. I also have one of each in my own personal home and they are the same distance from the wall.
Colbyt
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...in _this_ lifetime? What about in previous lifetimes? I hadn't realized we needed to keep track of previous-lifetime accomplishments. ;)
R
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The standard for both elongated and round is 12". Colby and Rico are correct.
I have installed between 35 and 50 toilets in my life, including 7-8 elongated bowl, 4-5 10" rough round front toilets, and three 14" rough round front toilets. I haven't seen any elongated toilets other than 12" rough, but I wouldn't doubt that they exist.
JK
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I slightly prefer the elongated toilet to match the other toilets in the home. I didn't realize that bowl type was connected to distance to the wall. I'm willing to go with either type with a strong preference to a good fit.
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It's not. The rough-in dimension is a nominal dimension and there is some leeway.
Here's one Toto 10" rough toilet: http://www.totousa.com/admin/upload/pdfspc/s-ms874114sg-0308.pdf It shows a more-or-less standard 3/4" clearance from the toilet to the wall. If you're not tiling the wall behind the toilet you should be fine.
R
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Speaking of Toto toilets, I had recently renovated my in-laws bathroom, and I had roughed in a standard 12" toilet drain. We had ordered a Toto ADA compliant elongated 12" 2 piece toilet, and to my surprise after we installed it there is still a good 1 1/2" of space between the tank and wall. And I confirmed that this is a standard bowl for 12" rough in. Why this happened, I don't know, but just a suggestion, do some field measurements of the toilet bowl at the showroom. Some manufacturers might do things differently.
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On Sun, 3 Aug 2008 20:27:08 -0700 (PDT), Mikepier

I'm beginning to think that a spec of 12" to the wall may or may not include a 1.5" space between the tank and wall. I'm guess that allows for tiling, wanes coating, paneling, etc. Not what I intended, but it looks like I'm going to buy the toilet BEFORE putting up the wall.
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Wise choice. The spec sheet will always indicate the clearance to the wall as well as the rough in dimension. There's always room back there.
I think that Toto understates the clearance from the tank to the wall. The 3/4" indicated on their cut sheets in actuality is a _very_ heavy 3/4". 1" plus is more like it.
R
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RicodJour wrote:

Check whether the clearance is to the back of the tank or to the back edge of a lid hanging out past the back of the tank.
--
Steve Bell
New Life Home Improvement
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