toilet tank shut off valve question


i attempted to replace a valve stem on the shut off valve. removing it was easy. unfortunately couldn't find right size replacement.
so Plan B, replace entire valve and use new flex tubing to toilet tank.
simple enough.
attempted to undo the nut holding the valve to the pipe coming out of wall.
it was REALLY torqued down (compression fitting?) - realized a split second too late i should be using another wrench to keep the valve body from rotating.
the valve body ended up being rotated about a 1/4 turn.
what are the odds i damaged the pipe ??
or did i just rotate the entire valve around a flanged edge of a pipe and the pipe could not have twisted ?
i'm calling in a "pro" at this point.
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007 wrote:

A good likelyhood the valve is soldered to copper pipe and you twisted the pipe. But then you may have broke loose the solder joint also. A good decision to call in the pro.
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uhmmm, the valve body is sort of an upside down " T ", one end going into the wall (with a nut on it), the middle part with a tube going to the toilet tank, the other end had a stem coming out of it where a handle was attached.
so i turned the nut that was closest to the wall, and it rotated the entire valve body - before i realized - oops! must use another wrench to keep valve body from twisting.
unless you mean there's a threaded pipe (for the nut to attach to), that was soldered in to the main supply ?
how are they typically installed ??
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Just turn it back its probably fine and not worth the money for a plumber.
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At 5200 Woodlawn, in Chicago, a building I think was from the 40's, we had separate hot and cold faucets in the bathroom sink. Fine but the water was burning hot. I bought a mixer but it wouldn't stay on since the two faucets toed in. So I straightened out the cold water a bit with my hands, less than a quarter turn. Everything was fine for days or iirc weeks, and then it started leaking. Copper pipe I think.
Had to be repaired by a plumber.
Story time: Had to fix it that night so it didn't flood the floor. Put a bucket under it but the bucket filled up. Emptied the bucket into the toilet, and so I could empty it easier the next time, I put the empty bucket on a wood box or something to raise it a bit above the toilet. Took a foot or two piece of hose left over from chem lab to make a siphon. Wasn't long enough so I stuck a thick soda straw into one end and routed that underneath the toilet seat.
The goal was to use this every time I had to empty the water, so that I could let the water get higher in the bucket, and heavier.
But the siphon slowed down as the water levels were more nearly equal, and sped up when the water in the bucket got higher. It reached equilibrium, and though we called the landlord the next day, we didn't have to call it a crisis. The plumber didn't come for a week, and the siphon worked the entire time with no need to turn off the water, no maintenance, and no spillage.
Oh yeah, I draped a rag or wash cloth from the dripping pipe to the water in the bucket, so we wouldn't have to listen to the water dripping. The whole setup took 10 or 15 minutes, everything worked on the first try better than I ever imagined was possible.

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