toilet, sink above tile?

I need to undertake a bathroom remodeling project (people who've read my previous thread will know why).
I plan on replacing a vanity/sink with a pedestal sink and possibly replace the toilet as well. I will need to pull up the existing vinyl sheet flooring. Tub and tub surround will stay.
I've Googled and read that the pedestal sink goes above new flooring (which will likely be ceramic tile). What about the toilet? Do I need to remove the toilet, lay tile, then have new toilet installed?
My initial thoughts are to remove the old vanity cabinet myself (because the sink is actually attached to the wall and the vanity cabinet build around it), remove the flooring and then lay tile. After tile is laid, call the plumber and have him remove the sink and install new pedestal sink.
But the toilet could throw a wrench into things if I have to remove it to lay tile.
Advice?
Thanks
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Fisrt a ceramic tile needs a subfloor that won`t move you probably don`t have one, concrete board should be used it is the thinnest strongest material for tile, even joists can be weak , rotted . Take everything out, old baths often have rotted wood that has to be fixed first. Honestly you could have a major job but won`t know till you look . This could be a reason it is not tile now. Get out a pro to give ideas , better then finding out the worst is a total redo.
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pgg wrote:

my
vinyl
need to

(because
build
laid,
pedestal
it to

Simple answer. Pull the toilet too. It is simple to pull, simple to replace (you don't need a plumber) and a -lot- easier to install tile with it out of there.
Harry K
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pgg wrote:

Absolutely.
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Your only bath, thats why they make 5 gallon buckets and Burger King has clean washrooms. Tub stays but if supports are rotted no. My last 2 day bath redo was new sub floor, new joists supports even the ceiling below had to go. For years water went to the lowspot, the toilet and rotted alot of wood. It ended up being a week using a 5. Removing the vinyl will show alot as will floor flex indicate rot. Tile needs to not move at all. A pro will point out possible issues. Baths easily take the longest of any job due to unforseens from years of water unseen to you but finding wood to rot.
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On Fri, 15 Apr 2005 06:59:17 -0500, m Ransley wrote:

Its the only bathroom in my house.
Would the bathtub have to be removed?
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wrote:

After you take care of any subflooring issues around the toilet you should lay the tile all around the sewer opening and install the toilet on top of the tile. Make sure you get the extended wax ring or the kind with the funnel attached to it since your floor will be higher now.
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I have to take exception with the part "concrete board..strongest"
Concrete board has minimum strength..You can put it on walls as a tile backer but as a sub floor, they need something stiff and strong under tile..like a 5/8 min T&G subfloor..preferably 3/4" and even then, another layer of something strong like 3/8" ply..glued and screwed. If the floor flexes, so will the cement board.
R
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