Toilet - Round two pieces vs one piece toilet


I'm thinking to replace my standard round two pieces toilet in the guest bathroom with one piece Briggs elongated toilet.
I don't know anything about this so please bear with me. The spare bathroom is tiny. When the tile man removed the toilet to install the tiles, there was a big nasty hole there. I'd like to know if the new one piece would fit right in that hole.
How do I know for sure it will fit? Do I need to measure from the center of the hole to the wall (yuck!)? Just don't want to carry that thing home and it doesn't fit.
Thanks for all your input. April
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You need the measurement from the center of the pipe to the wall.
if its easier to measure , get from the pipe edge to the wall, and the pipe diameter (although the are a standard size.
I hope if the old toilet is removed that you have a temporary cap on that sewer line. even platic wrap from the kitchen is better than nothing.
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Arpil wrote:

You measure from the center of the flange (hole) to the surface of the wall. It's probably 12 inches. There are also 10" rough-in toilets (I think that's the measure) if a standard 12" won't fit. Last time I was looking at flanges at HD, I think I saw some offset flanges that would add 2 inches to the rough-in distance.
BTW, you need to cover the hole with a margarine tub lid or something -- keep sewer gas out of your house, and keep things from falling down the hole.
Best regards, Bob
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Yes, cover the hole.
Not only does it smell bad, it can be explosive.
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Have you ever tried to replace the entire flapper assembly in a one piece toilet? Also, they are normally low rise, taking away a little gravity from the flush. I view them as one "piece" of crap
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Eric in North TX wrote:

I put in a 1-piece toilet about 3 or 4 years ago. I've had no problems with it at all, and it flushes much better than my old toilet. It hasn't needed a new flapper yet. I imagine replacing the overflow tube and flapper seat would be an interesting chore (where do you access the nut?) I did replace the pilot-operated fill valve with an old-fashioned brass ballcock after the plastic fill valve water-hammered itself to death after just a few months.
I'm remodeling the bathroom now, and I will have to pull the toilet up to tile behind it, then again a couple of days later to grout. :-( If it was a conventional toilet I could just remove the tank for each of these steps.
One-piece are also a lot heavier and cumbersome to move. They are fine when they are bolted down, and they are easier to clean than a 2-piece.
Bob
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If the room is already 'tiny' be careful with the elongated toilet. They do stick into the room farther than a standard round model, so be sure that things like doors open (both the door to the room and to cabinets and linen closets). If they are already close to the bowl when you open them, they are likely not to clear the elongated bowl. Also keep in mind that toilet seats are somewhat more expensive for these, and if the wife likes to put one of those fuzzy seat covers on the lid, these too are hard to find for elongated seats.

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But -- keep in mind some of the "round" toilets are only suitable for women to use. They are so small that parts of the male anatomy will contact the porcelain or the water level if it is high. Very uncomfortable and unsanitary.

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