Toilet Rebuilding: Need Advice on Parts

I convinced myself yesterday that I have the ability to rebuild my toilets from the wax ring up. I replaced some of tank parts in the past at my first house, but never have progressed to taking the tank off of the bowl. The only things that scare me are the two bolts on the tank/bowl and replacing of the wax ring and bolts on the floor. The bolts on the floor really bother me because I don't know how they are attached to the floor and they are probably severly rusted. Hopefully I'll get over these fears once I've been able to get everyone out of the house for a few hours. My plan is to work on only one toilet at a time, taking each one entirely apart, laying out all of the parts on the floor on a plastic bag, then figuring out what parts & sizes I need and then putting it back together.
The toilets are American Standard and are 19 years old. Aside from the flappers, I am sure everything is original. It is black city in the tank from the decay of rubber parts. I need some advice on some brand names which hold up. I see that the big box hardware stores sell many different brands and types, ranging from in expensive to moderately expensive. The big box store is an easy way to go, but I wanted to get some comments on which parts/companies to avoid. Or maybe I should just avoid the big box stores and purchase the parts somewhere else. Any advice would be appreciated.
Wade
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Wade wrote:

<SNIP>
Sounds like OCD. Why remove the tank? You may be asking for trouble.
And, unless the wax ring is leaking or the bowl wobbly, I would leave that alone too.
As to how the bolts are attached to the floor, there are many variables:
Ages ago, gimlet screws were run directly into the wooden flooring. Later, cast iron flanges were in use with brass TEE bolts. But, you might find brass flanges with 1/4-20 tapped holes and brass threaded rod screwed in. And lead bends with soldered brass flanges. Or, brass flanges and TEE bolts. Or, PVC/ABS flanges with or without steel rings and TEE bolts.
This stuff can get tricky and, yes, stuff routinely breaks and then you're SOL. If you go ahead, have a helpful hardware store nearby ( as opposed to Big Box).
Jim
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Why not just buy yourself whole new complete toilets . Newer thrones flush super well and save super amounts of water all at the same time.

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No one could every convince me that the 1.6 gallon toilets are as good as the old ones. It has always blown my mind that we have a law restricting the amount of water toilets use, but at the same time I see alot of waste of resources everytime I leave the house. Besides, why throw away a perfectly good toilet? I guess I could put them on ebay...LOL. I figure the insides won't run me more than $30 for each one, so I probably will go the route of replacing the working parts. I think though I am going to leave the wax rings alone.

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"Wade" wrote in...

Newest of them are bunches better than they were 5yrs ago. Supposedly save the average home near 10gallons per person per day - that's 300 gallons per month. ($11 month here) They say 1.6g toilets originally received dual flushes 20% of the time and today's newest batch of 1.6g toilets surveyed people says dual flushed about once per month.
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Go ahead, get an American Standard Cadet. But when you're putting tank on, stop. Put metal washer, then rubber washer onto the bolt, put it in from the inside of the tank. Then, on the underside of the tank, another rubber washer, then metal washer, then snug them up with the thin nut. Do this way in both holes. Put the flapper in, and the fill valve. Now you could put water in the tank, and it shouldn't leak out. For some reason, some installers put the bolt through to the lower portion and snug it up, and run a big risk of breaking the tank, or having a leak later at the bolts. Do it right the first time.

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