Toilet pipe too high out of concrete floor!

Hey, I have a 90 degree pipe for a toilet flange sticking out of the concre te about 1 1/2 inches. So I bought a PVC, cast iron replacement flange. the one with the compressi on ring around it. I then cut the pipe level with the floor, but since it was a 90 degree elbo w, it didn't go straight down,but curved. So then I bought a bunch, maybe 3 different flanges to see if any would go in. One of them went in but obvio us it wasn't tight to the outside of the pipe. Then I went and bought a 45 and 90 degree pipe to see which one would fit in the existing 4" pipe the b est. Neither did but cutting off the top 1 1/2 inch, it will fit in the pip e with about 3/16 inch space around it. The question then is: Would it be better to put silicone caulk in the space to hold the pipe in place or an epoxy? Then the flange can get PVC glued i n to it. I hope the question is clear. Thanks! D
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On Wednesday, June 11, 2014 8:07:50 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

3 different flanges to see if any would go in. One of them went in but obv ious it wasn't tight to the outside of the pipe. Then I went and bought a 4 5 and 90 degree pipe to see which one would fit in the existing 4" pipe the best. Neither did but cutting off the top 1 1/2 inch, it will fit in the p ipe with about 3/16 inch space around it.

in to it. I hope the question is clear.

I'd work on the flange to make it fit. Can't you you trim it some to get i t to fit?
Otherwise I'd not sure. Neither filler will "melt" into the pvc like a nor mal joint does. I am a big fan of epoxy so I guess that would probably be my choice. Rough up the surfaces if you do this. You can mix stuff like m icroballoons or chopped fiberglass to the epoxy to make it thick.
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You said: "So I bought a PVC, cast iron replacement flange"
I'm confused. Is the existing pipe that comes out of the floor cast iron or PVC?
If the existing pipe is cast, a PVC flange can be leaded in. I think that would be better than either caulk or epoxy. You might consider calling a plumber that has the skills to lead the PVC fittings to the cast to ensure a firm connection.
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It's a concrete floor. Just form around the toilet and pour a couple inches of lightweight concrete slab on top.
Oh, you already cut off the pipe?
Glue it back on.
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I would get all the pieces ready for final assembly, including the wax seal and the hold-down bolts. I would then use copious amounts of silicone rub ber on everything in sight, except the wax seal itself. I would even put s ilicone rubber around the perimeter of the wax seal, so that once the rubbe r cured, there would be no way for any moisture to escape from the pipe con glomeration. I would then bolt the toilet down, maybe within 1/8 inch of t otally bolted down, and then leave things alone for 24 hours. I would then finish tightening the hold-down bolts. Short of a 300 pound person rockin g the toilet, or an earthquake, yuou should have a fine installation.
For extra insurance, you could also run a bead of silicone rubber around th e perimeter of the base of the toilet. Since it is on a slab, there is no danger of any escaped moisture rotting the floorboards.
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I wonder if a 3" elbow would take less space than a 4" elbow?
You could bust out the concrete around the existing elbow, and transition the 3" elbow to the 4" pipe under the floor. It might give you that extra inch or so for the closet flange to fit properly. Then mix up a bag of two of concrete and patch the floor. You could wrap some foam or something around the top of the pipe that you could remove after the concrete sets. This would let you slip a normal flange on the pipe.
It would be a bit more involved, but probably more reliable than trying to hack a sloppy fit with the current setup.
Of course, I would compare a 3" elbow and 4" elbow at the store to see if there's any real difference in height before I start busting out concrete. :)
Good luck!
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
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