Toilet Flapper Valve Leaks after Replacement

To all,
I recently replaced the flapper valve in an older toilet. However the water slowly leaks throught the flapper causing the water to refill every 10 minutes or so. The opening where the flapper fits into is about 2 1/4 inches in diameter. It seems none of the hardware suppliers have a flapper for this size opening.
Does anyone know where I can purchase a flapper for this size?
Thanks, Scott
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Scott wrote:

Instead of a flapper, consider a FluidMaster "Flusher Fixer" http://www.fluidmaster.com/usa.html
This assy gets adhered to the existing seat. Tip: clean the seat with sandpaper first and use a hair dryer to thoroughly dry the surface.
This thing works with *most* existing valve designs, but there are limits.
Jim
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Scott wrote:

I had the same problem and it was caused by tightening the nut on the rubber grommet too tight. I got it to stop but eventually switched to the Fluid Master as recommended by Jim.
Frank
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I found this to work pretty well. After replacement, put a layer of vasoline on the rubber flap where is contacts the seat. Eventually, the rubber will conform to the seat and when the vasoline goes away, the flap will continue to seat tight. This was actually recommended in the instructions on one of the replacement flaps.
F.H. wrote:

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In alt.home.repair on Mon, 18 Oct 2004 04:06:07 GMT Art Todesco

What a great idea. Takes advantage of the fact that vasoline causes rubber to deteriorate. Something the latex condom makers keep warning about. (Reverse situation.)
I don't think this is Scott's problem, but I had a terrible time finding a flapper to fit, even though I have a standard Elger toilet. I thought they were a popular brand (there are 300 of them in my own little n'hood.) and should be easy to find. Finally found one at a neighborhood hardware store, then bought 5 more. But then they stopped having them. But I still have some, and I used the model number and the web to find someone who has more. I'm going to buy enough so that if I live here for the rest of my life (38 years?) I'll have enough for all three toilets. (If this doesn't work, I'll take Jim's advice too.)
They last 5 or 10 years, but the first year I was here, I used 1000 Flushes in all 3 toilets, and black stains soon appeared in the toilets and they all started leaking. I sent them back to the company, including the flappers, and they nicely sent me a check for 3 flappers and 3 of their products. I don't get it. Surely they tested their product with all brands of flapper. These were less than 5 years old, because the house was only 4 years old when I bought it.
Of course, until this house I never lived anywhere more than 10 years, except Brooklyn where people in apartments had Flushometers, no tanks.

Meirman If emailing, please let me know whether or not you are posting the same letter.
Change domain to erols.com, if necessary.
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You know, I thought about that, however, the rubber is pretty thick ... compared to a latex condom, and it does wash away in time, so it probably doesn't do a lot of damage to the rubber. But hey, it does seem to work. I think some of my problems stem from a bad design from American Standard on their 1 piece toilet. The tank is low which equates to less pressure on the flap to mold it into seating tight. BTW, the AmStan Hamilton (and its earlier model name ... can't remember that name) is probably one of worst flushing toilets on the market. I have 3 of these and they ALWAY plug up. I think the problem is too small a flush channel and a finish which is not real smooth both inside and out.
meirman wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Scott) wrote in message

Scott,
Kohler toilets, in particular, sometimes require a "special" flapper. I've found, that the "universal" flappers don't work well in Kohler toilets. Is your toilet, perhaps a Kohler?
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do yourself a favor, replace all of the toilet inards. I just did one after work this evening.
Fluidmaster sells a complete kit for ~$18 but I cheaped out & just bought the fill valve & complete flapper assy (~$11 total)
Empty the tank, sponge out the water dismount the tank, replace the guts, re-mount tank.
About 45 minutes & works great.
cheers
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Bob K 207 wrote:

HA! Says you. Been there, done that. 45 minutes if all goes absolutely perfect, nothing is stuck/frozen/corroded in place and The Gods of home repair smile on you. Try 4 hours, 2 (more) trips to the the hardware store, 7 or 8 busted knuckles and about $9.00 contributed to the "cuss can" in .25 increments.
Sorry, but this is a big pet peeve. "we" come on here and tell folks this is a 45 minute cakewalk and 3 hours later they're bleeding and throwing toilet tanks out of windows or down stairs. Please don't mislead these poor souls.
--
The real Tom Pendergast [ So if you meet me, have some courtesy,
aka I-zheet M'drurz [ have some sympathy, and some taste.
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Just did one Tues night in 45 minutes, the key is removing the tank & working on the kitchen table (covered with old towels).
The sink faucet hookup (inside a small cabinet, in the same 3' by 4' bathroom) was a whole different experience; about 2 hours of swearing & head bumping. I forgot to re-check the drain fit up when I changed sink types. Wound up having to remove the wall stub working inisde the cabinet, should have loosened it when the cabinet was out of the room :(

If you're unlucky :)

It's all about planning, experience & having the right tools.
Remember the 7P's
Prior Proper Planning Prevents Piss Poor Performance
In any case, working on toilet tank when it is off the bowl is a joy compared to fighting with it when still attached.
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