toilet flapper again

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Two of my toilets are of the same model. Both are made by American Standard and both use the flapper as shown in the following link:
http://www.lowes.com/pd_236807-143-PP830-9L_0__?productId375098
Lowe's sells this flapper for around $9. Here, I need to pay more than $30 for it.
About three months ago, one flapper would not come down after flushing. I thoroughly cleaned it and then put it back. It started to leak. I tried many things but ended up buying a new one.
Now, the other toilet has the exact same problem. Yesterday, I was informed that the flapper would not come down. I went to check it. It was not leaking at that time. I removed the flapper and cleaned it. After I put it back, it started to leak, just like the other one. I used a toothbrush and a plastic brush to clean. They should not damage the flapper.
Can anyone explain why a flapper which was not leaking leaks after cleaning? Much appreciated.
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On 10/01/2015 10:43 PM, John Smith wrote:

Maybe you did not ruin it...possible it was just deformed a bit and not seated properly.
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philo wrote:

I don.t remember ever clng a flapper but tank seat for it. We have pretty hard water. Flapper is made of pretty springy rubber like fish fins. Rough handling it may render it no good. For slow leak check use some dye drops.
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On 02/10/2015 10:53, Tony Hwang wrote:

The water tank is coated with a layer of black gunk, up to the water line mark. The chain, inlet valve, flapper, everything is coated with the black gunk. It is not difficult to remove. It just take time.
The reason the flapper stayed up and refused to come down is because the drain hole on the flapper was plugged with the black gunk.
There is no need to use dye to check for leaking. Two minutes after the water tank is full and water is cut off (no hissing sound) water starts to slowly fill again. This is definite a sign of leaking.
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John Smith wrote: ...

did you also clean the rim that the flapper sits upon to seal?
our water tank builds up gunk that i need to clean out once a year or so. also clean the rim so that is is smooth once again, but along with that i take the flapper off and clean it and put a very thin layer of vaseline on it which keeps it going for another year.
songbird
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In alt.home.repair, on Fri, 2 Oct 2015 00:41:01 -0400, songbird

Doesn't vaseline itself rot rubber and latex?
I know that I read not to use it latex condoms.

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micky wrote: ...

haven't noticed a problem with it so far (17 years).
songbird
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On 10/2/2015 1:22 AM, micky wrote:

[Why it lasts only a year?]

Center posted as a courtesy. - . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On 02/10/2015 11:11, songbird wrote:

Yes. I cleaned the rim also. It did not help.
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John Smith wrote:

Checking the rough spot?
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In alt.home.repair, on Fri, 2 Oct 2015 10:13:32 +0630, John Smith

Flappers seem to wear out consistently, in the same amount of time, so if one wears out, one the same age might not be far behind.

The rubber was ready to crumble and brushing it made it crumble?
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On 02/10/2015 11:20, micky wrote:

Both toilets are more than 10 years old. I understand that the flapper probably has passed its useful life. I just don't understand why it did not leak before cleaning but did so after cleaning.
Toothbrush is quite soft. The other brush is a bit harder. Yet, there is no scratch marks on the rubber. The rubber has some "goose bumps". I can only guess that gunk filled up the gap between "goose bumps". After cleaning, the gunk is gone and the flapper starts to leak.
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On Friday, October 2, 2015 at 5:26:52 AM UTC-4, John Smith wrote:

You got 10 years on a flapper? I'm lucky to get 2. I think it depends on your water.
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John Smith wrote: ...

if it isn't smooth then that will cause a leak. using a thin layer of vaseline (or some other water- proof grease) might smooth it out enough to seal completely.
songbird
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songbird wrote:

Worst, time to replace toilet. Replcing flap is not even a rocket science. I like red colored flap by Korky. Costs little more, good stuff.
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On Friday, October 2, 2015 at 2:26:52 AM UTC-7, John Smith wrote:

A toothbrush isn't enough. You need to scrub both the flapper and the seat with a wet cloth or paper towel.
Goose bumps indicate the flapper was made of vinyl, or maybe a blend of vinyl and rubber. They'll disappear after the flapper dries out for a few weeks, and some vinyl flappers will also change from grey back to black. But a vinyl flapper can develop a permanent set, like a ring indentation where it pressed against the seat of the drain, or even a warp, and it's common for them to not seal any more.
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Did you also clean the seat (the part it rests on when it's shut). Clean that too! Of that seat is worn or corroded, you may need to replace that too. That requires removal of the toilet tank. Not a hard job, but time consuming, and will probably require new tank to bowl bolts and rubber seals as well.
I assume you checked to make sure the chain is not holding it up a little, or some other object in the way....
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On 02/10/2015 11:36, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

I cleaned the rim with my hand.
No. It is not the chain. Once the toilet is flushed, water starts to fill up the tank. When the tank is full, water is cut off. After one or two minutes, water starts to fill slowly, definite a sign of leaking.
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On 10/1/2015 11:43 PM, John Smith wrote:

Maybe the gunk you cleaned made the seal. Is the toilet itself clean? Could be some mineral buildup on it.
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What is causing the black gunk? Our main toilets are 50 years old and the insides of the tanks are barely coated with a light film of stuff. You can see right thru whatever has built up and read the original writing on the inside tank walls.
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