Toilet clog problem

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wrote:

I can understand your concern, but I can only speak from experience.
The only time I have ever cracked a toilet is when the back swing of a sledge hammer hit the rim.
While doing a bathroom remodel I was torn between keeping the old toliet and replacing it. An errant swing of the sledge made that decision fairly easy.
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On Fri, 17 Sep 2010 09:25:49 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

If you saw my current bathroom you wouldn't say that. There's maybe 18" floor inches to the tub, the same to the vanity, and maybe 3' to the facing wall.
Sure, a contortionist could move the toilet out of the way right there to get at the stack, but why? And I could lift the whole thing up and carry it out with some careful maneuvering, dripping whatever on the hallway carpeting on the way to, where, the kitchen? But again, why? If I have a go at mine for any reason I'll pull the tank, lay it in on a rag in the tub in 3 seconds and not worry about a clumsy assembly. Probably put the bowl next to it so I could clean the floor good.
Removing the tank is standard practice for me and was for the plumber I worked for. Both of us were very strong, BTW. The circa 1930-40' Chicago apartment building baths I worked on with him had similar sized bathrooms to mine. Mine is 12' x 4' 10". I looked at some "professional" plumber forums to see what I was missing and found that some never remove the tank. Seems their reasoning is saving time on a paid job or they don't want to deal with corroded tank bolts.
Doesn't change my mind at all. I also do automotive work and have seen plenty of "professional" mechanics do work differently than I would. And I've had furniture and appliances delivered by "professional" movers and was surprised to see one guy get of the truck. Usually he was up to it but mostly I've had to help to prevent my door trim and walls from getting banged up.

Me! I like my work area clear of unnecessary clutter.

I think that's the big bugaboo. Only reason I can think of. It's takes me maybe 5 minutes to remove tank bolts. Maybe 10 minutes once. Wide screwdriver and wrench/channel locks/visegrips. If it's frozen a hacksaw blade gets through quick. They're soft brass. I've never removed a bowl due to clogging, just for a new toilet or ring replacement. Every time R&Ring the tank internals was also due. If I was a plumber and pulled an old toilet for ring or clog, I might sell the client new tank internals. They're cheap enough. If he wouldn't buy that he'd still get new tank bolts and seals. It's really trivial. I don't want to offend you or any professional plumbers who do the same as you, but I just have to say the very thought of me lugging around a toilet with tank attached is one I have a lot of trouble visualizing. Just can't come into focus.
Maybe that's why you can't find a video anywhere of somebody carrying a toilet with tank, excepting the cartoon you posted.
I did find this: http://www.suite101.com/content/replacing-a-toilet-a27752 "If you’re not going to be carrying the toilet straight out, find a place where you can temporarily set the old toilet and put plastic sheeting or garbage bags down. This not only protects the floor from water, but also from the residue of the wax ring or other contaminants. It’s best to have two people carry the toilet, but one strong person can do it by standing over the bowl with one foot on each side (sort of in a squat facing the tank), and lifting where the bowl connects to the tank. With your legs straddling the toilet and your elbows resting on your knees, you have to do a shuffle to navigate your way to the toilet’s landing place, but it can be done."
And this contraption is made - I guess - to avoid removing the tank http://www.pipetytes.com/toilettruck.html
This discussion kind of reminds me of the Catalytic Converter "lockup" thread. I find the idea of locking up my catalytic converter or moving a toilet with tank attached ludicrous. But others feel differently about both. In the end we do what works for us.
--Vic
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re: "but one strong person can do it by standing over the bowl with one foot on each side (sort of in a squat facing the tank), and lifting where the bowl connects to the tank."
That's exactly how I do it...and I'm curious as to what they mean by "strong".
I'm no body building super stud, trust me, but, to keep it relevant, I'm strong enough to put a toilet on a cart at HD, load it into my van, move it into the house, decide I don't like it, put it back into my van, back on a cart and back into HD, by myself.
I can then repeat the process at Lowes, again, by myself.
Granted - I really would have liked to have had help, but just wasn't available.
If that makes me "strong", I'll accept that.
BTW..I always find it interesting that when people are trying to make a point, they detail the worst that can happen:
"dripping whatever on the hallway carpeting"
"a clumsy assembly"
I don't drip anything onto the floor, and I find the straight up and down lifting of the unit pretty simple and efficient.
As you said..."In the end we do what works for us."
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Ok basics:)
Flush toilet with bucket of water, does it always fush OK?
If it does NOT then pull toilet and make it into a big project.....
If using a bucket flushes properly the toliet asnd drain lines are fine:)
the problem is the internal passages inside the toilet that send water around the bowl rim.the water comes from the small line that goes to the dip tube in the tank
these passages and exit holes under the rim can get sediment buildup over time, it slows water flow,.
flush toilet and watch water in bowl, does it just swirl around?
if so acid is your friend for 5 bucks and a few minutes time its easily fixable. its safe effective easy and worth trying before you pull toilet, which can have downsides.
like ooops the flange cracked, ooops the water line in the wall has developed a leak, the wife says as long as your pulling the toilet lets remodel the bathroom, etc etc etc,..,
try the bucket flush and report back here with the results
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