Toilet clog problem

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My toilet has been plugging up a lot recently. I do not think it is the trap in the toilet because when I put a toilet auger down the toilet, it did not hit the clog until it was about 26 inches down.
Is there a SeeSnake type inspection camera that is flexible enough to go through a toilet trap? Is there anything else I can do to identify the problem? Thank you in advance for all replies.
--
Whenever I hear or think of the song "Great green gobs of greasy
grimey gopher guts" I imagine my cat saying; "That sounds REALLY,
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My toilet's innards began malfunctioning a while back, which meant that the tank filled up with less water than before. It was just enough of a difference to make it flush badly and clog more often. After using a working toilet for long enough, you should have some sense of whether the flush cycle seems normal. Does it?
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Pulling and reinstalling a toilet is typically an easy job. One water connection and 2 bolts to remove, some clean up of the old wax ring and the "sticking on" of a new one prior to bolting the bowl back down.
Assuming it's your first time, In and Out shouldn't take more than an hour, not including putting your tools away afterwards, and that's working really slow.
Granted, you could run into issues with the shoe or something else, but that's pretty rare.
Once the toilet is off, you can use a bigger snake or a camera or maybe even a flashlight, depending on your configuration and the location of the clog.
Keep this in mind:
The "clog' you think you hit might not even be the clog. There's lots of tales in this NG about snakes going right past the problem, such as the time I had a toilet paper roll stuck in the bottom of the toilet. Liquids and some solids would pass through it - as would the snake - but it often clogged when paper caught the rim of the roll. I didn't find the problem until I pulled the toilet and look into the bottom.
I still keep a spare wax ring in the shop just in case I need to pull a toilet in an "emergency". Once you've done it, you'll see how easy it is.
Tip: They usually suggest a sponge or towel to soak up the remaining water in the tank or bowl, but I always use my shop vac with a small diameter hose. That gets it almost bone dry.
Good luck!
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wrote:

Pulling and reinstalling a toilet is typically an easy job. One water connection and 2 bolts to remove, some clean up of the old wax ring and the "sticking on" of a new one prior to bolting the bowl back down.
Assuming it's your first time, In and Out shouldn't take more than an hour, not including putting your tools away afterwards, and that's working really slow.
Granted, you could run into issues with the shoe or something else, but that's pretty rare.
Once the toilet is off, you can use a bigger snake or a camera or maybe even a flashlight, depending on your configuration and the location of the clog.
Keep this in mind:
The "clog' you think you hit might not even be the clog. There's lots of tales in this NG about snakes going right past the problem, such as the time I had a toilet paper roll stuck in the bottom of the toilet. Liquids and some solids would pass through it - as would the snake - but it often clogged when paper caught the rim of the roll. I didn't find the problem until I pulled the toilet and look into the bottom.
I still keep a spare wax ring in the shop just in case I need to pull a toilet in an "emergency". Once you've done it, you'll see how easy it is.
Tip: They usually suggest a sponge or towel to soak up the remaining water in the tank or bowl, but I always use my shop vac with a small diameter hose. That gets it almost bone dry.
Good luck!
===========
I think he should flush some fresh crabs down the toilet to chew through whatever's there.
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wrote:

It can be an easy job or it could be bad. I've seen the closet ring/bolts crash and burn as soon as you move them. But then again, actually a good thing to get it before it starts leaking just enough to rot the subfloor but not be noticed by eye.
My story is intermittent poor flush. Did the auger thing. Pulled the toilet. Ran hose in top and bottom directions. Nothing. Then just happened to move it right and out comes a toothbrush. SWMBO dumped dirty bucket of water down the toilet. Cleaning brush not visable.
Oh well. Shit happens.
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wrote:

Some shit is worse than other shit. I have a Tramco lift system in my house. *Everything* goes through the pump. After almost 50 years the pump started to fail. Worked fine the 12 years I'd been in the house. It was a PITA to find a good plumber to do the job but I found one and $2100 later I had a new pump in. A couple weeks later the pump starts vibrating. Figured it was a defect. Get the guy back and he says he's never had an install fail. He had to pull the pump out of the tank. Ladies panties all wound up in the impeller. I have my suspicion about how that happened, but a suspicion is only that. I did momentarily think about posting a sign in the bathroom saying, VISITORS: If you shit your panties DON'T flush them down the toilet!
Anyway another $290 fixed me up, and believe me, I got off cheap. It's good when your plumber is a former seminarian.
--Vic
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Sounds like a problem I had, toilet would work OK 3 times out of 4 ran the snake through it numerous times couldnt find anything, Finally bit the bullet and pulled it apart and there was a pencil to long to make the turn in the pipe. Must have been just the right length that it could make it through the trap and not the turn in the plumbing.
Jimmie
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On Thu, 16 Sep 2010 13:09:42 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Before you do anything removing the toilet, make sure the siphon jet isn't plugged up with scale. That's the hole under water on the front of the bowl. I just posted about my experience with that, which was similar to yours. A weak vortex is an indicator, but the problem develops slowly enough that you might notice the vortex is weak.

Couple of points. Depending on age of toilet and plumbing hardware, you're better being prepared to replace the stop and line to the tank. The tank should be removed first, so that's 2 more bolts that might be too rusty to re-use. Always do this kind of stuff either having the parts, or when you can go get them at the hardware store.
--Vic
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re: "The tank should be removed first"
First? Why would you remove the tank at all?
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wrote:

re: "The tank should be removed first"
First? Why would you remove the tank at all? =========== So you can clean behind it for the first time in 27 years.
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On Thu, 16 Sep 2010 14:40:13 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

I admit this question surprises me. Sort of like asking why first remove the TV from the TV stand when you're going to flip it over to fix a leg. But maybe others do it that way. I've pulled and/or replaced maybe 15-20 toilets, none real modern. Had a job with a plumber for a while, and do my own plumbing.
The tank was always about half the weight of the toilet, that's one reason. The tanks doubled the height of the toilet, and increased the depth by about 25%. Most were in a fairly tight space next to a vanity, so moving them out is easier in 2 pieces, that's another reason.
The first one I ever put in, I put the tank on before putting the bowl on the stack. When moving it in the tank wiggled on the washer and I heard a slight crackling of ceramic. I stopped right there and took the tank back off to check it. It was okay. But I never did that again. Never broke a tank. That's the big reason.
Do you really flip a toilet over with the tank on? All the more power to you. I have no experience with "modern" toilets. Let's say post-1995.
--Vic
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And it makes the toilet WAY rear-heavy and difficult to balance when you're muscling it around by yourself. It's a good way to induce dislodgement of the wax ring while setting the toilet in place. Myself, I pull the tank.
--
Tegger

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Well, I guess space has never been issue, but every toilet I've ever pulled and reinstalled, I've done with the tank on.
I face teh tank, straddle the seat and grab the toilet just behind the seat bolts and lift. That method keeps the toilet balanced and moves it up or down the bolts in a straight path. I then waddle my way around to wherever I need to take the toilet.
And yes, I've flipped - well, laid on its side - many a toilet with the tank on. I'm always gentle and I usually lay towels or cardboard on the floor. I've never had a problem and I don't think I could count how many I've done.
The only time I've installed them in 2 pieces is for a new install.
To be sure, I've never carried one this way:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tJC3uuG6ZMA

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I've only done 4 or 5 toilets, but I can't imagine leaving the tank on unless you have a huge room with amazing amounts of space to move around in. All the bathrooms I've ever worked in were not big enough to lay the toilet over on its side and still have room to work comfortably.
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wrote:

How much time are you spending under your toilets? <g>
Best case is you're cleaning some wax ring residue, worst case you're removing whatever is clogging it.
You know, you *can* lay it down right where it used to be standing.
Besides, who's trying to get "comfortable" while cleaning a toilet?
And then there's the option of moving it to another room, which is what I did when I removed my mom's so they could lay new linoleum.
When I consider the option of trying to remove the rusted bolts from inside the tank vs. moving the toilet as one piece, I'll opt for the one piece every time.
Maybe that's why I'm so quick to suggest pulling the toilet when trying to find a clog. It's a really simple job - if you don't remove the tank.
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I work in maintenance (in a nursing home) and pull bowls on a regular basis. If you grab the toilet by the point of lid attachment...it balances pretty well. My estimation would be one third the weight for the tank (empty of course!) and almost nothing added to the depth. If I can't fit a dolly in the room to move it...I put the bowl between my knees and waddle-walk it to where I can dolly it. JM2.02
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Well, it's nice to hear that my method is used by someone who works "in the field". :-)
A question: do you ever have to lay the toilet over to clean the bottom? Do you do this with the tank attached?
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re: "The tanks doubled the height of the toilet, and increased the depth by about 25%. "
I missed this part earlier. Toilets have changed!
The tank on my new toilet adds 0% to the depth of the unit. The rear of the bowl is at least flush (no pun intended) with, if not *beyond*, the rear of the tank.
That was the first thing I noticed when I brought the unit home. I actually wasn't sure if the bowl would fit over the bolts without touching the base board behind it, but it makes it by less than an inch.
My old bowl had, I don't know, 4" - 5" between the bowl and the wall, this new toilet has next to nothing. It also doesn't stick out as far into the room, which is probably why they call it a "space saver".
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Daniel Prince wrote:

Someone must have sneezed out a tampon, it went down the drain and swelled up.
--
LSMFT

I look outside this morning and everything was in 3D!
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My concern is the stress that you put on the tank and tank bolts when the tank is not in its normal position over the bowl.
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