Toilet Broken Overflow Tube


While replacing the flapper valve in our American Standard toilet (probably 20 something years old) the overflow tube broke right off at the bottom. It appears that it was screwed in but that the threaded end is still stuck in the bottom. Any advise on what to do? It would seem that if I could just get the threaded piece out I could get a new overflow tube and screw it in. Thanks in advance.
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Jeffy3 wrote:

You can replace the entire thing if you take the tank off the bowl. Brass is way better than plastic.
Use a sawzall to cut the bolts attaching tank to bowl, those bolts will be rusted frozen in place
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com says...

Sawzall? Nutz, use a Dremmel tool with a cut-off wheel to slice the nuts in half and you won't break the tank or the bowl.
*Always* replace all hardware (including gaskets) when you got a toilet apart. It's easy.
--
Keith

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you can try to play with the old original parts. for our 20 tenants and ourselves, we have changed our toilets to fluidmaster parts. you'll be using the secondary toilet during this repair. i would: wetvac, old towels, water off, suck water from tank, remove water supply nut, disconnect upper tank, replace broken item, replace all tank parts and rubber parts and any rubber cushions between water tank and bowl, install new bolt set. we like to install fluidmaster flusher fixer for a complete flush. replace fill valve [ballcock], inspect and replace flush handle as needed. before you start: you know the floor bolts and wax seal can now be updated easier with the upper tank off because of the water and the weight. fate will determine if the next sewer blockage reveals the wax seal is bad. see new waxless seal by fluidmaster. suck water from bowl, take nuts off bolts, rock and lift bowl gently holding it level then dump it onto old towels in tub and rest it upside down there. fluidmaster directions are great on their website and in their packaging. repair floor flange if broken. install new floor bolts. buy the american standard part if you can get away with it but if you put all new parts in you might be good for another long stretch of years. surprisingly the toilet parts are inexpensive. buy a nice new seat. buy a variety of all of them and return what you don't use. see them all at: www.fluidmaster.com see also parts at: www.hdsupply.com
Jeffy3 wrote:

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leaks can be minimized by putting silicon bathtub caulk on all sealing surfaces after drying everything well.
then let the reassembled toilet sit a couple hours so it cures well
This taught to me by a old plumber who tired of taking stugf apart twice.
Stuff peels right off if ever necessary:) no long term damage
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Jeffy3 wrote:

Get the finest tooth hacksaw blade. Break off one end, so that you can work the teeth in closer. Hold the blade vertical inside the brass fitting. (Use a good glove) Scrape the threads with the teeth as you revolve the blade around the fitting opening. With some effort and patience you should be able to extract the broken brass threads.
Take the old tube to a big hardware store (I doubt that BigBox will be much help.) There are 3 different Refill tube (Overflow) diameters. Match one up. Saw cut to proper length. Use sealant (Loctite) on the threads.
Jim
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Speedy Jim wrote:

Jiim, thanks. I think I'll give that a try and then call a plumber if it doesn't work. I don't mine keeping the economy going by paying a plumber. I just didn't want to pay one to replace the flapper valve, which is a job that doesn't even require tools!
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Speedy Jim wrote:

Jim thanks again. This worked like a charm. The toilet is up and running (pun intended).
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replying to Speedy Jim, Paulie wrote:

Jim - Well its been a lot of years since you posted this fix, it worked like a charm for me too! We have a 1926 Camden Pottery toilet that was original in our Boston home and still working great today. I thought for sure I was going to have to replace the entire flush valve and crack those ancient nuts on the elbow connecting our wall mounted tank to the bowl. I had no idea that their were threads and this method was great time-saver! Less than $4 for a new brass overflow valve, an Old Milwaukee mini Hacksaw for less than $15 and a pair of 32 TPI fine hacksaw blades for $3 and I was all set. I thought I was going to have to keep scraping the threads until they were gone, but using a headlamp I thought I saw them rotate and, sure enough, I was able to rotate them out in one piece by hand.
Thanks so much Speedy Jim!
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Buy the repair kit from FluidMaster and fix the whole tank while you have it off, never use caulking as it doesn.t work here. The earlier post suggesting it forget, use the proper seals and washers you won,t need it. I have done this for 25 yrs and it is not hard. Saying that I think you said it was 20 plus years old consider a new one Jeffy3 wrote:

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jim wrote:

DEFINETELY USE ALL NEW WASHERS AND HARDWARE!
The silicone bathtub caulk is a belt and suspenders pproach and saves multiple reassemblies
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jim wrote:

If it's 20 years old, that makes it even more worthwhile to fix it rather than get a new (low flow) one.

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