Toilet Blocks Bathroom Door From Fully Opening

Problem: House I recently purchased has a toilet that blocks the bathroom door from opening fully, by about 1.5". Access to the bathroom is 21" between open bathroom door and opposite wall.
Rough opening for waste pipe = 14"
Measurement from waste pipe/bowl attachment bolts to bowl front also 14".
I am trying to find a bowl with measurements less than 14" from attachment bolts to front of bowl...I'm having no luck.
My only alternatives seem to be moving cast iron waste pipe (have access in basement) back a few inches) :-( or re-hanging the bathroom door so it opens out. I have even checked into bi-fold doors, which would clear the toilet bowl in the bathroom, but cannot find bi-folds in a 28" size.
Any other options or suggestions?
Thanks -
Mark
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On 20 Feb 2004 16:33:38 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Question Mark) wrote:

You can buy offset floor flanges. They are more common for PVC than cast iron, but they are available for both. I have seen them with offsets of as much as 2 inches (at least in PVC). (try searching for offset closet floor flange). There are disadvantages though...they clog easier, and some raise the flange too high so you have to put a spacer under the toilet.
If you have bottom access, it would probably be easiest to rent a chain cast iron pipe snapper to cut the old pipe, then use a hubless coupling to transition to PVC set 2 inches closer to the wall. Most modern toilets are designed for a 12" rough in. If you have access and there's no framing in the way it really isn't that bad of a job. And if you're only moving it 2 inches you won't have to patch the floor up nice since the toilet will cover the old hole.
HTH,
Paul Franklin
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(Question

I think I'm going to bite the bullet and cut the cast iron waste pipe then replace with a 12" rough in using the above-referenced PVC/hubless coupling combo. Everything is accessible and this solution seems to be the right one for the long term.
Thanks for all the information everyone offered...truly hepful. I'll post a followup with results, mishaps, mayhem or drama.
Mark
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Buy a 24" pre-hung door and 2 2x4's and some sheetrock scraps.
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that's what I would do also !
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You don't mention, but is your toilet a round or elongated bowl? A round bowl may be just enough smaller to fit. IT could be that someone has replaced this once before and used the elongated style. I can't think that anyone would design and build a house with this problem.

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Yes...it is a round bowl. The house is approx. 100 years old. The current toilet is obviously a replacement for a toilet that, once upon a time, fit within the bathroom and it's door dimensions.
Thanks very much for the reply.

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Question Mark) wrote in

From Ask TOH (This Old House)
http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/tvprograms/asktoh/showresources/episode/0 ,16663,516206-514048,00.html
Check out the picture at the top of the page.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Replacing a 14-inch Rough-in Toilet
Richard helps a homeowner replace a large 1920s wall-mounted toilet with a new model designed to fit his existing flange.
Where to Find It Richard installed a 1.6-GPF Carrollton two-piece toilet (model #CST774S). It can accommodate a 10-inch, 12-inch or 14-inch rough-in using a special Uni-fit flange attachment. It is manufactured by:
Toto USA, Inc. 1155 Southern Road Morrow, Georgia 30260 770-282-8686 www.totusa.com
Richard created the spacer to go under the toilet using DuPont Corian solid surfacing (www.corian.com). He glued two sheets together and planed the material to the correct height. He then created a template of the footprint of the toilet and cut the shape using router with a carbide bit.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Question Mark) wrote in

You might have luck with something like this.
http://tinyurl.com/ytxeg
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<< My only alternatives seem to be moving cast iron waste pipe (have access in basement) back a few inches) >>
Probably your best option is to reset the critter to the standard 12" from the wall. Another option for even more clearance is to use a close coupled toilet. Most old fashioned plumbing houses (where the pros shop) will have the 10" type toilets. Logically having a good 4" extra would solve your problem. Go for a quality Kohler unit since their close coupled water savers work great on the first flush (I've got one in fancy Mexican sand color). The better performance seems to be related to the design and good glazing of the porcelain. HTH
Joe
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