Toenailing thru pressure wood

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wrote:

I found your OP hard to understand. You don't have to reply, but I'll mark things in this post I find hard to understand.

bulk? pw?

after coming out the bottom or still showing because you can't get the screw in all the way?

Not sure why it should be awkward. Isn't the wood a whole board that will just lie there?

If the wood is that hard, drill one smaller hole that goes deep and a slightly bigger hole, probably only in the first piece of wood, to take the shank. Just drill as deep as the shank goes.
Someone mentioned tapered drill bits. With only a little time to look, I found http://www.harborfreight.com/22-piece-carbon-steel-tapered-drill-bit-and-countersink-set-7608.html but this doesn't have the wider part for the shank. But others have both sections and a countersink. This one does have the built-in countersink.
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On Monday, July 7, 2014 5:26:49 PM UTC-4, micky wrote:

them in. I get thru with the points showing through but having resistance w hen penetrating the side pressure wood that I want to connect them to. The cordless drill just can't take it. I went as far as making a mark where it would enter if there were no resistance, with a drill bit. That didn't work ... cause now, the top part of the screw met resistance. Is there a way tha t I could get this done without any snags?

ard, to meet that pre-drilled hole .

http://i349.photobucket.com/albums/q386/Novel8/screw.jpg
Should have uploaded this at the beginning. Sorry..PW should have been PT ( pressure treated )
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On 7/7/2014 8:31 AM, Anthony wrote: ...

While you don't say what the two pieces are, sounds like
a) you simply don't have enough torque in your driver, and
b) to compensate, you need to predrill a pilot hole for the shank in the first piece--a screw will not pull the piece tight to the second if the two aren't tightly together to begin with because the threads remain at the same relative spacing. Only the fortuitous case of stripping the threads in the top piece while the bottom ones hold will bring the two together when the head comes in contact; and that doesn't happen often enough to count on.
It's rare, however, with PT lumber it's hard enough to be a problem unless it's very old material in one or the other pieces--new stuff from the 'yard is generally full of water and quite soft.
Or, of course, just nail 'em instead...
OBTW, you don't mention the style of screw you're using -- that and what the actual work is could help to envision the problem.
--


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A photo or two would make this whole thing a lot easier to understand, as I still can't figure out what your problem is escept for an underpowered drill.
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wrote:

And of course you should just use a drill with a cord. So much easier. You can buy a 100' extension cord for less than the price of a good cordless drill and the extension cord has lots of other uses too.
If you're putting in a deck or a floor, you don't need 100 feet. You can use almost anything.
If there is no power where you are, get somone to turn it on.
(I recently found a receptacle here, outside in a box, that must have been used during construction when there were no houses with outlets.)
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And when I put a knife in the rind, it cracked more.
But tasted good, and never split in half.
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I have a very high quality Milwaukee.
I just had a small project where I had to "toenail" into hardwood and nope, those screws will just not go in...it's definitely not a "lack of power in the drill situation" . Though if I were "toenailing" into soft wood it would have worked...I think those screws really need to be drive straight-in to get a bite.
I had to drill a pilot hole.
As I mentioned before, a pilot hole is a good idea to prevent the wood from cracking.
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micky;3257273 Wrote:

No, don't buy a 100 foot extension cord.
Buy three 25 foot extension cords and a couple of 10 foot cords instead. That way when you only need a short cord you don't have to bother with a long cord.
--
nestork

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http://i349.photobucket.com/albums/q386/Novel8/screw.jpg

If you do not drill the first board it will be difficult for the boards to pull up tight. You have to drill the first board with a large enough hole the screw threads do not cut into the wood and you let the head of the screw keep the wood from pulling back.
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On Tuesday, July 8, 2014 10:52:14 AM UTC-4, Ralph Mowery wrote:

I did pre drill the main hole, but of course it was smaller than the screw. Are you saying I should have made a larger pre drill hole? I would have no problem in unscrewing it and make a larger drill hole?
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You need to drill the hole on the top board large enough that the screw threads do not touch it. If you do not do it this way, whatever gap you have in the boards when the screw goes into the lower board will tend to stay there unless by chance you strip out the threads in the upper board. The screw should hold by the head and not depend on the threads in the board where the head of the screw is.
In effect you are only screwing into one of the boards.
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wrote:

I've done a lot of baseboard and never to toe-nailed it except when a stud wasn't available. Then I use finishing nails. Why are you using screws?
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On Tue, 8 Jul 2014 20:10:42 -0400, "Ralph Mowery"

I get your point, but in case the OP hasn't, Imagine a long machine screw and you screw a nut on half an inch down the screw. Call this the first nut. Then you screw a second nut on, so the two nuts are a half inch apart. Then you hold both nuts between your thumb and your forefinger and turn the screw clockwise. Both nuts will get closer to the head but they will stay 1/2" from each other. When the first nut reaches the head of the screw or the end of the threads, the screw won't turn anymore and the second nut will still be a 1/2 inch from being tight, and were there anything between the two nuts, it would not be tightly gripped.
The first nut (that is, the hole in the first piece of wood) needs to be big enough that it can move up and down the screw without needing to turn the screw. The hole in the first piece, the top piece, of wood needs to be bigger than the threads in the screw.
unless by chance you strip out the threads in the upper board.

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