Toenailing thru pressure wood

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I'm trying to toenail a couple of galvanized 2 screws. I am familiar with t he process of sliding soap on the threads to make it easier to screw them i n. I get thru with the points showing through but having resistance when pe netrating the side pressure wood that I want to connect them to. The cordle ss drill just can't take it. I went as far as making a mark where it would enter if there were no resistance, with a drill bit. That didn't work... ca use now, the top part of the screw met resistance. Is there a way that I co uld get this done without any snags?
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Ok, just off the top of my head...get a better cordless drill.
I'm have troubling picturing any problem with what you are trying to do (since you didn't post a picture) but I can't think of a reason why you would be having trouble, other than a drill with not enough power.
(Just yesterday I watched a guy struggling to enlarge a 3/8" hole in a 3/8” steel plate with a HF cordless drill. He needed a half inch hole. Must have taken him 15 minutes and half a can of PB Blaster. Wrong tool and wrong lubricant. What can I say...)
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wrote:

or use a corded drill with enough oomph.
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Sure. Your cordless drill is not strong enough if you can't toenail pressure treated wood.
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If you plan to run 100' of extension cord, I suggest 12g, maybe even 10, but probably not 14.
Of course, who needs a bunch of 25' 10g extension cords? Overkill in most cases, but a good idea when you need 100'.
(Let the discussion begin!)
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On Tue, 8 Jul 2014 21:43:17 +0000 (UTC), DerbyDad03

My point was that he can get to the farthest corner of his house and probably his yard with an extension cord, that 100 feet is no problem, and ftm for the small amount a drill uses, I'm sure 200 feet is no problem. I assumed he already had shorter extension cords.
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On 07/08/2014 07:35 PM, micky wrote:

For the 38 years I had been on the job, I always used a 100 ft extension cord. #14 is fine, there was no significant voltage drop even using a heavy duty 1/2" drill.
In those 38 years, there was never a time the cord was too short to get to the work area, but a number of times, it /just/ made it.
One day I went to a warehouse and a contractor in there apparently did not believe in extension cords...they were using a /gasoline/ fueled generator. Though the warehouse was huge enough that no one got carbon-monoxide poisoning, it was a really stupid thing to do. Eventually a supervisor told them not to use it.
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I have a 100' that I haven't used since I dumped my electric lawn edger. Used it when I had an electric mower, edger, hedge trimmer. It was connected to a 50'. I've used the 50' since for tools when I need the reach. String it through the closest house window, or through a garage door and it reaches everywhere I would need it. The 100' still stays rolled on the garden reel. The 50' is much easier to handle, and I can add a couple 20's to it if I needed to. So unless you're a contractor or have electric lawn equipment, a 100' is overkill. But if you think you need it, buy it. It was nice for mowing the lawn and edging.
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Anthony wrote:

Hi, I think your drill is not strong enough? It is one shot deal without pause once you start. I used quite an amount of PT planks for our front and rear deck at our cabin. . Make sure battery is fully charged. Zap, zap... screw goes down so effortlessly. When wood is very dry it needs more torque for sure. Make sure Robertson or Phillips bit is fresh one.
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On Sunday, July 6, 2014 6:01:44 PM UTC-4, Tony Hwang wrote:

th the process of sliding soap on the threads to make it easier to screw th em in. I get thru with the points showing through but having resistance whe n penetrating the side pressure wood that I want to connect them to. The co rdless drill just can't take it. I went as far as making a mark where it wo uld enter if there were no resistance, with a drill bit. That didn't work.. . cause now, the top part of the screw met resistance. Is there a way that I could get this done without any snags?

Can you tell me how one can tell if a cordless drill is not strong enough, other than a weak battery? BTW, this one takes the 18v lithium battery
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Anthony wrote:

Hi, Mine is DeWalt 18V one. Has torque adj. knob with lock position. Deck screws I used has blue-yellowish color.
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You should drill wood with the proper size bit. Check this chart for one: http://www.ou.edu/aoi/images/Wood%20Screw%20Drill%20Sizes.pdf
You may want to check this out: http://www.familyhandyman.com/carpentry/how-to-drive-screws-perfectly/view-all
There are tapered bits epecially for wood screws.
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I agree with Ralph Mowery on this one. If your cordless drill can't drive the screw in, then predrill a hole for the screw.
Choose your drill bit size according to the "root" diameter of the screw, which is the solid core of the screw. Doing that actually produces a better fastening because you get nearly the same holding power of the screw while putting substantially less splitting force in the wood. Any place that sells fasteners should be able to order X-tra long drill bits in the size you need.
--
nestork


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wrote:

Soap is something I used a lot more of when I didn't own a drill. Are you using your drill only to screw in the screws, or are you drilling a hole first, like you should?
I believe some people even drill small holes for nails.
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On Monday, July 7, 2014 4:45:50 AM UTC-4, micky wrote:

h the process of sliding soap on the threads to make it easier to screw the m in. I get thru with the points showing through but having resistance when penetrating the side pressure wood that I want to connect them to. The cor dless drill just can't take it. I went as far as making a mark where it wou ld enter if there were no resistance, with a drill bit. That didn't work... cause now, the top part of the screw met resistance. Is there a way that I could get this done without any snags?

Like I said in my OP i did get the screw through the bulk pw and a half in ch ot the screw is showing ...my problem is getting that part of the screw into the other pw. I predrilled a hole there and now its a matter of holdin g the wood which is awkward, to meet that pre-drilled hole . In the meantim e, the unthreaded part of the screw is not able to go through ..was I suppo se to 'soap' that part too?
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On 07/06/2014 02:53 PM, Anthony wrote:

Drill a small pilot hole
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philo wrote:

Hi, My idea of using drill is to save time. If pilot holes have to be drilled for every screw to fasten, that defeats the purpose of using drill. What's the point of owning a tool which is not up to the task at hand? If it is for one time use, one can rent proper one at a small expense.
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On 07/07/2014 05:58 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

Good point, he must be using a defective drill, I only drill pilot holes to prevent the wood from cracking, I can certainly shoot a hole through just about anything.
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philo wrote:

Hi, Only time to use pilot hole is when doing finishing carpentry with exotic expensive wood..... Better be careful with them, LOL!
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On 07/07/2014 06:40 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

Most any wood can crack...so I generally use two drills if possible
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