To Roundup or not Roundup

Page 1 of 2  
I have this little patch of land that backs up to my lot that was deeded to me recently. I have a few areas that I want to plant "regular" grass instead of the stuff that planted itself when it was still farm field. I have hoed the area that I am planting this time to bare ground. I am trying to decide if I just want to go ahead and plant the new grass or if I should nuke the area with Roundup and then wait about 4 weeks before I start on the grass. Any suggestions?
--
People thought cybersex was a safe alternative,
until patients started presenting with sexually
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Use the Roundup and wait. If you don't, you are guaranteed to eventually have weeds like you wouldn't believe.
--
Tegger

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/27/11 9:09 PM, Tegger wrote:

I doubt Roundup will do much good. It has to be sprayed directly on the plant as I remember. There are some pre emerge herbicides that farmers use. The names of those escape me now. You might try the local seed supply place for suggestions. Weeds will grow as long as there is no shade. Some seeds have germinated after literally decades of storage.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 27 Jun 2011 21:19:28 -0500, Dean Hoffman

Turn the soil - let ig green up, roundup, turn again, let green up, roundup, turn and seed.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Start at a local nursery. Note I did not say WalMart Garden Section, nor Home Depot. Preen is a pre emergent herbicide that works well when applied at the right season. Roundup is good, too, but has to be sprayed on the plant. It is neutralized when it reaches the soil, hence you are not killing the soil for a year or two. But yes, kill it out, then plant. Tilling helps to get out the roots, too. You can simply spray the fresh tilled soil to hit the roots. Spray and wait then hoe or rake. Takes a while, but the time and effort will come back to you later.
Steve
Heart surgery pending? www.heartsurgerysurvivalguide.com Heart Surgery Survival Guide
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Why? All of the stores above have both products that you mentioned, including Roundup which is the suitable one.

This pre-emergent is equally effective against the grass seed he wants to plant, meaning it will not grow.
>Roundup is good, too, but has to be sprayed on the

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You do need to be observant with the Roundup - they come in all different concentrations from ready-mix to 45%.The higherconcentrations tend to be less expensive on an after adding water basis.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/27/2011 8:21 PM, Kurt Ullman wrote:

you could nuke it and throw seed the same day. Roundup doesn't hurt seed.
--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Kurt Ullman wrote:

Since the ground is bare, Roundup will do nothing.
A pre-emergent herbicide could help. If the area is sunny, so would staking down some black plastic over the area and letting it cook the ground for a month or so.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/28/2011 7:41 AM, dadiOH wrote:

Good advice. Cook in summer, reseed in early fall. Worry about weeds next year. Eliminating every weed and bug is not advised :o) We use insane amounts of poison on our lawns and gardens; better to leave at least some area to native plants and trees.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/28/2011 6:41 AM, dadiOH wrote:

Most pre-emergent herbicides will also kill the sprouting grass seed.
This is a two-step task: seeding and weed control. The OP has to decide which one to do first. Since we're headed into the hottest time of the year, I'd suggest waiting a month or so anyway to start the lawn, and it sounds like that's what he planned to do anyway. If he wants to hit emerging weeds in the meantime with Roundup or Finale, that'd be okay. Broadleaved-only weedkillers persist in the soil for several weeks, so he should avoid using those. If he wants to use a pre-emergent, he'll need to look for one that won't harm grass seedlings. Not all that easy to find, and it's a good bit more expensive.
I'd not worry too much about weed control for the time being. If it's a smaller area, the weeds can be prevented by laying a barrier over the area. When he's ready to seed, he can remove the barrier (I have some old tarps I keep for this), apply a starter fertilizer, and seed or sod. Once the grass is up and has been mowed at least three times, he can safely apply a weedkiller if he needs to do so.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Finally, some sanity.

All sound advice.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Kurt Ullman wrote:

Cover with black plastic for a few good hot days to bake the soil? Can also apply specialty soil fumigants under the plastic. As someone noted, Roundup has to be applied to actual plants, not soil.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

As Normie said, leave some native plants. Wife's philosophy: Perennials are better. I'll try anything,preferably native or native-like. If it grows, be kind to it. If it doesn't, too bad, onwards with the next plant. Just be careful with invasive plants, such as mints.
--
Best regards
Han
email address is invalid
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Han wrote:

Would you like a few thousand dog fennel? :)
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No, thanks. Tried and discarded, even before we moved to the US in '69.
--
Best regards
Han
email address is invalid
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article

Is hoeing considered tilling in this case or do I need to actually rent something?
--
People thought cybersex was a safe alternative,
until patients started presenting with sexually
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Just saw a facebook page where strawbaling was used to kill weeds etc. Second link when you google "hoeing and tilling". I have no idea whether you are talking 20x30 feet, 200x300 feet or 2x3 miles of land. We killed the lawn in front of our first home by covering with newspaper. Worked just fine, and we got a very nice front garden. The next owners of course promptly took all our nice plants out and made it a lawn, but we had 18 years of a nice front flower garden. No chemicals other than mulch.
--
Best regards
Han
email address is invalid
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Han wrote:

I've seen people around here using cardboard held down with rocks or cinder blocks. Looks like %&!#, but it works.
Depending on the size of the area, I'd just pull up the turf.
Jon
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/28/2011 8:49 AM, Kurt Ullman wrote:

Hoeing is tilling "lite"...tearing up sod, breaking it apart and levelling soil is heavy labor :o) The average roto-tiller can't do it well, but a heavy one can. The black plastic approach, or simply putting down heavy mulch (all of next fall's leaves) might make it plantable in the following spring. Or try a cheat...buy a few hostas, plant them here and there, and wait...they grow almost everywhere, shade out most weeds, and make for a nice low-maintenance bed.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.